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Ben Affleck's Ex Lindsay Shookus Gushes Over Her 'Best Dates' to 2018 Emmys, One Year After They Went Together

Ben Affleck, who? 

The 46-year-old actor appears to be in Lindsay Shookus‘ rearview mirror, as she took to Instagram to gush over her dates to the 2018 Emmys on Monday. 

Shookus, who split from Affleck this summer almost a year after they attended the 2017 Emmys together, took home the trophy for Outstanding Variety Sketch Series alongside her fellow Saturday Night Live producers at this year’s awards show. She won the same award last year, and in 2015, took home the Emmy for Outstanding Variety Special for her work on the show’s 40th Anniversary Special.

“Best dates in the world,” Shookus captioned a shot of herself posing with her Emmy and her gal pals. 

Monday’s Emmys was Shookus’ first public appearance since her split from Affleck after a year of dating. In August, the Justice League star entered rehab for his ongoing battle with alcoholism, an effort Shookus tried to inspire prior to their split, a source told ET at the time.

“Ben had been drinking and Lindsay was encouraging him to stop,” the source claimed. “At that point, he still didn’t seem to feel he had a real problem. Sadly, he spiraled very quickly, and Lindsay felt helpless.”

“Lindsay wanted Ben to go to rehab, but had trouble getting him there,” the source added. “He didn’t want to be controlled and ended things with Lindsay.”

It was Affleck’s other ex, Jennifer Garner, who drove him to rehab last month following his outings with Playboy model Shauna Sexton. Affleck and Sexton have been spotted out together on several occasions recently, which another source told ET has been hard on Shookus. 

“Lindsay was supporting Ben in the beginning, but now he seems to be relying more on Shauna than Lindsay and she is devastated,” the source said of how the SNL producer was handling Affleck’s latest drama. “She believed he would get sober and they would work it out, but that isn’t how things seem to be panning out.”

See more in the video below. 

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Blue Jays GM feels Donaldson trade was 'best decision' for team's future

The Toronto Blue Jays decided moving Josh Donaldson now was a better idea than holding onto a star third baseman with an uncertain future.

That was the message from Blue Jays general manager Ross Atkins in a conference call with reporters on Saturday, one day after rebuilding Toronto traded the injury-plagued 2015 AL MVP to the Cleveland Indians for a player to be named later.

"Josh is an incredible player and will continue to be a great player … As we weighed our alternatives, it just came down to us feeling this was the best [move] for us in the moment," Atkins said.

Out of the lineup since late May with a calf injury, Donaldson returned for a rehab game on Tuesday night with single-A Dunedin. That allowed the Blue Jays to place Donaldson on waivers and potentially trade him prior to Friday's deadline for players to be moved and still be eligible for a post-season roster.

If they didn't trade Donaldson on Friday, the Jays could have made a qualifying offer of around $ 18 US million and received a compensatory draft pick if he signed elsewhere.

While Atkins did not mention it, one factor in the decision could have been the emergence of fellow third baseman Vladimir Guerrero Jr., the top prospect in baseball. He's expected to join the Jays in late April next year, allowing Toronto to maintain Guerrero's contract rights for an additional season.

"I think every decision we make, we weigh the potential risk and upside and decided ultimately this was the best thing for the organization as we considered our alternatives with Josh," Atkins said. "We feel very good about the return. Ultimately, we felt it was the best decision for our future."

Atkins hints at solid return

Atkins would not name the player to be named later, but said it has been agreed upon by both teams. Right-hander Julian Merryweather has been mentioned as a possible candidate in several reports. He needed Tommy John surgery after an elbow injury in the spring.

"What I can tell you is that we're excited about the return," Atkins said. "It's a near-term prospect we feel can impact our major-league team in a significant way."

Atkins said there was no animosity between the Jays and Donaldson for the player's decision to follow his own training program in the off-season or how his rehab was handled. He also said there was no pressure from the Jays organization for Donaldson to return to the field, something that had to happen for the third baseman to be placed on waivers.

"We were not pressuring him to play," Atkins said. "Josh was driving his timeline entirely leading us to when he wanted to play. We followed his lead on that."

Donaldson hinted at frustration in an interview with the Toronto Sun this week, saying "There's a lot I can say about that [Blue Jays management], but I choose not to say anything about it right now."

Atkins, who came to Toronto from the Indians organization along with Blue Jays president Mark Shapiro, said the deal with Cleveland offered the best return. He said they were in solid talks with four teams.

"It was a very difficult decision for us," Atkins said.

The Indians play a four-game series in Toronto starting Thursday.

Donaldson will reunite with former Blue Jays slugger Edwin Encarnacion in Cleveland.

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CBC | Sports News

Next 3-4 days the 'best and most ideal time' to rescue Thai youth soccer team from cave

A rescue mission for a young Thai soccer team and their coach trapped in a flooded cave can expect its best chance yet of success in the next three or four days, its leader said on Saturday.

But rescuers were also waging a "war with water and time" before expected heavy rains, said Chiang Rai Acting Gov. Narongsak Osatanakorn. Authorities were waiting for two big groups of volunteer divers to arrive later Saturday and Sunday, after which they'll be ready to begin the operation of bringing them out, he said.

Thai divers gather before they enter to the Tham Luang cave, where 12 boys and their soccer coach remain trapped, in the northern province of Chiang Rai, Thailand, on Friday. Authorities were waiting for two big groups of volunteer divers to arrive later Saturday and Sunday to begin the operation of bringing the team members out. (Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters)
 
Osatanakorn’s cautious message of hope came a day after the death of a Thai rescue diver, a grim turn in what began two weeks ago as a celebration of one of the boys’ birthdays at the Tham Luang cave complex in the northern province of Chiang Rai.

The death of Saman Gunan on Friday underscored the risks of making the underwater journey. The diver, the first fatality of the rescue effort, was a volunteer and died on a mission to place oxygen canisters along the route to where the boys and others are sheltered, said Rear Adm. Arpakorn Yookongkaew, Thai SEAL commander.

The boys, 11 to 16, and their coach went exploring in the cave after a soccer game June 23. Monsoon flooding cut off their escape and prevented rescuers from finding them for almost 10 days. The only way to reach them was by navigating dark and tight passageways filled with muddy water and strong currents and in oxygen-depleted air. 

For the first time since they were found, the boys on Friday communicated by letter with their relatives — many camped outside the cave's entrance — with both homesickness and humour.

At the sprawling cave mouth, lines of frogmen and soldiers with torches could be seen emerging from the darkness, as 
generators chugged and pumped water out from blue nylon pipes.

Dozens of Royal Thai Army soldiers rested on rocks outside the cave, with two of them saying they had been told by  superiors that the rescue operation would likely begin Sunday or the day after.

Earlier efforts to pump out water from the cave have been set back every time there has been a heavy rain.

Rescuers were unable to extend a hose pumping air all the way to where the boys are, but have brought them some oxygen tanks.

Authorities tightened a security cordon, draping plastic sheets around the approach to the cave, further giving the sense that a rescue might be imminent.

The body of Saman Gunan, a former Thai navy SEAL who died during an overnight mission, is carried during a repatriation and religious rites ceremony at Chiang Rai Airport on Friday. (Associated Press) 

This could not be independently corroborated by Reuters, but Narongsak told reporters earlier on Saturday that the next three to four days was "the best and most ideal time for the rescue operation."

"The current situation, with the air and water levels and the boys' health, is the best yet," he added. "We're still at war with water and time. The discovery … was just a small victory."

Billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk tweeted on Saturday that he had heard "some good feedback from cave experts in Thailand," and that an "escape pod" and inflatable tube he was developing might be used to help get the boys out.

He gave no details.

Former Navy SEAL was putting tanks along potential escape route for trapped children 1:03

Several monks in orange robes sat at a small shrine with two golden deer statues near the cave mouth, chanting, as a middle-aged woman knelt and prayed before them.

An assistant told Reuters the ceremony was to "open up" the cave mouth to allow for an easy and safe return for the boys.

Diver 'double positive' about mission

Ivan Katadzic, a Danish diving instructor who has been ferrying compressed air tanks into the cave, said after a dive on Friday he was "double positive" about the mission because the water level had dropped considerably.

A relative of the trapped boys cries near the cave complex while listening to a news conference about the death of the Thai rescue diver on Friday. (Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters)

Katadzic has not dived the final kilometre to where the boys are stranded on a muddy bank, the most dangerous part of the dive, during which rescuers have to hold their compressed air tanks in front of them to squeeze through submerged holes.

Alternative rescue plans include stocking the cave with supplies and an air line to keep the boys alive for months until Thailand's monsoon season ends, or drilling a shaft down from the forest above.
 
Narongsak said the drills would have to pierce 600 metres of fragile limestone rock to reach the boys and rescuers were discussing drilling angles.

Besides looking for possible holes from above, the team on the hill above is trying to block holes and divert streams that 
channel water into the cave before the weather turns.

"Everything is a race against time," said Kamolchai Kotcha, an official of the forest park where the cave complex is located. His team would camp out on the hill to try and finish its work before the rain came, he said.

Growing international interest in the rescue has spurred help from countries including Australia, Britain, China, Japan and the United States. 

"It's only natural for us to offer our help," Meir Schlomo, Israel's ambassador to Thailand, told Reuters at the scene.

In the first letter from the team that was sent out of the cave through divers, Ekapol Chanthawong, the 25-year-old coach of the Wild Boars soccer team, wrote: "To the parents of all the kids, right now the kids are all fine, the crew are taking good care. I promise I will care for the kids as best as possible. I want to say thanks for all the support and I want to apologize to the parents." 

(CBC)

The boys on the team wrote messages of hope.

One, by a boy identified as Tun, said: "Mom and dad, please don't worry, I am fine. I've told Yod to get ready to take me out for fried chicken. With love." The name reference could be of a waiting relative.

The rest of the scribbled letters on pages from a notebook struck similar messages for parents and urged them not to worry.

One boy named Mick wrote: "Don't be worried, I miss everyone. Grandpa, uncle, mom dad, and siblings I love you all. I'm happy being here inside, the navy SEALS have taken good care. Love you all."

(CBC)

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CBC | World News

'Best Christmas present': Lifelong best friends discover they're actually brothers

Two Hawaii men who grew up as best friends recently learned that they’re actually brothers and revealed the surprise to family and friends over the holidays.

Alan Robinson and Walter Macfarlane have been friends for 60 years. Born in Hawaii 15 months apart, they met in the sixth grade and played football together at a Honolulu prep school.

Macfarlane never knew his father. Robinson was adopted. Separately, they sought answers about their ancestry.

Macfarlane turned to family history and DNA-matching websites after unsuccessful searches on the internet and social media, Honolulu news station KHON-TV reported .

“So then we started digging into all the matches he started getting,” said his daughter, Cindy Macfarlane-Flores.

A top match — someone with identical X chromosomes — had the username Robi737. Robison’s nickname was Robi and he flew 737s for Aloha Airlines, Macfarlane-Flores said.

It turned out Robinson used the same website to find answers about his family. They later learned they have the same birth mother.

‘Best Christmas present I could ever imagine’

“It was a shock,” Macfarlane said.

They revealed the relationship to friends and family during a party Saturday night.

“It was an overwhelming experience, it’s still overwhelming,” Robinson said. “I don’t know how long it’s going to take for me to get over this feeling.”

They have plans to travel and enjoy retirement together.

“This is the best Christmas present I could ever imagine having,” Robinson said.

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CBC | World News

Mandy Moore Reveals Who The 'Best Crier' Is In The 'This Is Us' Cast: ‘He’s That Good!’

Because of laws surrounding child stars, the show often has to use baby dolls and in some weird instances, a robot baby.  

“It’s weird, guys,” she admitted. “We were just shooting an episode where we have two very emotional scenes where I’m talking to a newborn in the hospital. I go to put my hand on the robotic baby and it’s vibrating and making these weird movements. And you’re just like, ‘No, this is a real child.’ I’m trying my very best.”

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EXCLUSIVE: 98 Degrees Look Back on Style Regrets, 'Best Memories' of Their Career as Debut Album Turns 20

Playing EXCLUSIVE: 98 Degrees Look Back on Style Regrets, ‘Best Memories’ of Their Career as Debut Album Turns 20

Nick Lachey has a message for his younger self.

“I would have told myself 20 years ago, ‘Change your hairstyle,'” the singer, now 43, tells ET. “Don’t go with the ‘butt cut.'”

Saturday, July 29 marks the 20th anniversary of 98 Degrees‘ debut, self-titled album and the release of their first single, “Invisible Man.” In honor of the milestone, ET asked the band about their memories from that day and the wisdom they’ve gained since.

“It seems like yesterday, really,” Jeff Timmons, 44, says. “In that particular time, I think we were driving ourselves around in a Winnebago that was wrapped with our pictures on it and we were out there hustling and doing grass roots promotion … But the excitement of the whole thing, this germinated from a dream that we had together and all of a sudden we’re out there, the album’s in stores and we’re actually going into stores ourselves and buying our own records — all that kind of fun stuff back in the day.”

“He’s still paying off that credit card,” Justin Jeffre, 44, quips.

WATCH: 98 Degrees Say They’re Glad They Weren’t Famous During the Social Media Era 

“We would literally pull into a town, like, driving ourselves in a motorhome, and call a radio station and request our own song as many times as we possibly could,” Nick jokes. “In those days, you’re just doing anything and everything you can to get yourselves recognized.”

The work paid off — but looking back now, Drew Lachey, 40, wishes they had also played a little harder back in the day.

“Don’t take it so seriously,” he offers the band’s younger selves. “Enjoy it more, have more fun with it.”

“It’s funny because we tell these stories about 20 years ago and as I’m sitting here talking about it, those were some of the best memories of the whole ride for me,” Nick adds. “Those early days where it’s just kinda us against the world and, you know, we’re driving ourselves and pulling into a town and then doing our own show. To Drew’s point, I don’t know that we necessarily appreciated it as much in the moment ’cause we were so tired and so nervous about what was gonna happen.”

But mostly, it all comes back to those epic ’90s fashion moments.

“Fire all these stylists and get someone else,” Justin jokes.

“Maybe [wear] some smaller pants,” Jeff adds. “We had these gigantic pants.”

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ET – Latest Stories

EXCLUSIVE: 98 Degrees Look Back on Style Regrets, 'Best Memories' of Their Career as Debut Album Turns 20

Playing EXCLUSIVE: 98 Degrees Look Back on Style Regrets, ‘Best Memories’ of Their Career as Debut Album Turns 20

Nick Lachey has a message for his younger self.

“I would have told myself 20 years ago, ‘Change your hairstyle,'” the singer, now 43, tells ET. “Don’t go with the ‘butt cut.'”

Saturday, July 29 marks the 20th anniversary of 98 Degrees‘ debut, self-titled album and the release of their first single, “Invisible Man.” In honor of the milestone, ET asked the band about their memories from that day and the wisdom they’ve gained since.

“It seems like yesterday, really,” Jeff Timmons, 44, says. “In that particular time, I think we were driving ourselves around in a Winnebago that was wrapped with our pictures on it and we were out there hustling and doing grass roots promotion … But the excitement of the whole thing, this germinated from a dream that we had together and all of a sudden we’re out there, the album’s in stores and we’re actually going into stores ourselves and buying our own records — all that kind of fun stuff back in the day.”

“He’s still paying off that credit card,” Justin Jeffre, 44, quips.

WATCH: 98 Degrees Say They’re Glad They Weren’t Famous During the Social Media Era 

“We would literally pull into a town, like, driving ourselves in a motorhome, and call a radio station and request our own song as many times as we possibly could,” Nick jokes. “In those days, you’re just doing anything and everything you can to get yourselves recognized.”

The work paid off — but looking back now, Drew Lachey, 40, wishes they had also played a little harder back in the day.

“Don’t take it so seriously,” he offers the band’s younger selves. “Enjoy it more, have more fun with it.”

“It’s funny because we tell these stories about 20 years ago and as I’m sitting here talking about it, those were some of the best memories of the whole ride for me,” Nick adds. “Those early days where it’s just kinda us against the world and, you know, we’re driving ourselves and pulling into a town and then doing our own show. To Drew’s point, I don’t know that we necessarily appreciated it as much in the moment ’cause we were so tired and so nervous about what was gonna happen.”

But mostly, it all comes back to those epic ’90s fashion moments.

“Fire all these stylists and get someone else,” Justin jokes.

“Maybe [wear] some smaller pants,” Jeff adds. “We had these gigantic pants.”

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ET – Latest Stories – Music