Tag Archives: ‘gains

Laine’s departure has Jets faithful focused on loss — despite lucrative gains

Winnipeg Jets fans, stuck at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic without the ability to vent to their pals at the local pub, exploded with rage and sorrow Saturday over news on the NHL transaction wire.

Patrik Laine is a Columbus Blue Jacket, leaving the Jets faithful with many cold months to conduct a virtual post-mortem on what went so terribly wrong.

Laine was supposed to be the face of the franchise for the next decade. A second-overall pick in 2016, the Finnish power forward has size, speed, hands of silk and a personality the size of a prairie sky.

Now he’s gone.

WATCH | Rob Pizzo takes a look at the blockbuster Jets-Blue Jackets trade:

Two disgruntled star forwards finally get their wish, and are heading out of town. 1:56

Given Laine’s massive upside — and the fear he invokes in opponents given his ability to take over a game — you can forgive Winnipeg fans for focusing on what they’ve lost as opposed to what’s coming the other way.

“I won’t lie, it’s kind of sad,” Winnipeg captain Blake Wheeler said after news broke of Laine and disgruntled forward Jack Roslovic heading to Columbus for equally disgruntled centre Pierre-Luc Dubois and a third-round draft pick. “I just rewind to four years ago and the excitement when we drafted Patty and the steps our organization has taken the last four years. He’s a big part of that,” Wheeler said.

“It’s disappointing to be having this conversation.”

Disappointing, for Jets supporters, is an understatement. 

Devastating is more like it. 

Laine, in the beginning, wanted to be in Winnipeg. He delivered with 36 goals as a rookie and 44 as a sophomore. In his third season, he scored 21 goals in the first month butfinished the campaign with 30 — a sign of turbulence to come for the burgeoning superstar.

WATCH | Week 1 roundup of the NHL’s North Division:

In our new weekly segment, Rob Pizzo catches you up on the week that was in the all-Canadian division in the NHL. 4:25

But he rebounded to collect 68 points in 63 games in the 2019-20 season. And in his last game as a Jet on Jan. 14 against Calgary, he was simply dominant with two goals, including the overtime winner, and an assist in a 4-3 Winnipeg victory.

So what went wrong? In the simplest terms, Laine wanted a bigger role, and he didn’t want to wait for prime time.

Sure, he jumped over the boards on the first power-play unit. But he grew tired of not playing on the first line, night in and night out.

Not one to hide his feelings, the relationship between player and employer deteriorated to the point to where Laine’s agent Mike Liut said publicly during the off-season that both sides would likely be better off if they parted ways.

Maurice shoulders blame

On Saturday, Jets head coach Paul Maurice shouldered the blame for a divorce no one imagined back on draft day in 2016.

“The environment that you’re trying to create for each player is for them to feel like they have the opportunity to be at their best,” Maurice said. “We were constantly trying to work on that, trying to constantly get to the point where Patrik appreciated who he was playing with and the opportunity he was given.

“It’s the head coach’s responsibility, so I’ll take all of that.”

Once the shock wears off, Jets fans will no doubt see the upside of this rare NHL blockbuster. Dubois will need to quarantine for two weeks due to health regulations, but his eventual presence will give Winnipeg impressive depth up the middle along with Mark Scheifele, Dubois, Paul Stastny, Adam Lowry and Nate Thompson. Laine will need to quarantine for at least seven days before suiting up for the Blue Jackets.

A third overall pick in 2016, Dubois collected 159 points in his first 239 games. His relationship with Columbus head coach John Tortorella broke down in explosive fashion, and the youngster wanted out.


The third overall pick in 2016, Pierre-Luc Dubois collected 159 points in his first 239 games. Once the shock of losing Laine wears off, Jets fans will start to see what they have gained, not just what they have lost, writes Vicki Hall. (Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press)

Now he gets a fresh start on a team loaded with offensive talent — something he didn’t have in Columbus.

In truth, Winnipeg is likely better off without Laine given it seemed as though he no longer wanted to be there. The same holds true for Columbus. It’s tough in any relationship — or any environment — when one party badly wants out.

So often, hanging on hurts more than letting go.

“When I got to Winnipeg at 18 years old, I didn’t know what to expect,” Laine wrote Saturday in an Instagram post. “It became clear very quickly that this city loved hockey more than anything else. I couldn’t have asked for a more loyal, dedicated and passionate fanbase.”

For those fans, this one is going to hurt for a very long time.

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CBC | Sports News

Biden gains ground in key states as Trump accuses Democrats, without evidence, of trying to ‘steal’ election

The latest:

  • Electoral college vote stands at 253 for Biden, 214 for Trump.
  • Election observer says no evidence for Trump’s fraud claims.
  • Michigan, Georgia judges dismiss Trump campaign lawsuits.
  • Get all the U.S. election results as they come in.
  • How the electoral college determines who wins the U.S. presidency.
  • What do you want to know about the U.S. election? Email us at Ask@cbc.ca.

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden gained more ground on U.S. President Donald Trump in the battleground states of Georgia and Pennsylvania on Friday, edging closer to the White House hours after Trump falsely claimed the election was being “stolen” from him.

Biden had a 253 to 214 lead in the state-by-state electoral college vote that determines the winner and was inching toward securing the 270 votes needed in the remaining undecided swing states.

In Georgia, which has 16 electoral votes, Biden edged into the lead more than 900 votes early Friday morning. In Pennsylvania, which has 20 electoral votes, Biden cut Trump’s lead to just over 18,000.

The numbers in Georgia and Pennsylvania were expected to continue to move in Biden’s favour, with many of the outstanding ballots being from areas that typically vote Democratic, including the cities of Atlanta and Philadelphia.

Biden did see his lead in Arizona shrink to around 47,000 earlier, and was still ahead in Nevada by only 12,000 votes. The Associated Press and Fox News have called Arizona for Biden, but CBC News still considers it too close to call and is waiting to make the determination.

Biden would become the next president by winning Pennsylvania, or by winning two out of the trio of Georgia, Nevada and Arizona. Trump’s likeliest path appeared narrower — he needed to hang onto both Pennsylvania and Georgia and also to overtake Biden in either Nevada or Arizona.

As the country held its breath three days after Tuesday’s election day, Georgia and Pennsylvania officials expressed optimism they would finish counting on Friday, while Arizona and Nevada were still expected to take days to finalize their vote totals.

WATCH | Trump makes unfounded allegations about ‘illegal’ votes:

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said Thursday that Democrats could ‘try to steal the election from us’ if ‘illegal votes’ cast after election day were counted. There is no evidence that ballots were cast after Nov. 3. 0:40

Trump has sought to portray as fraudulent the slow counting of mail-in ballots, which surged in popularity due to fears of exposure to the coronavirus through in-person voting. As counts from those ballots have been tallied, they have eroded the initial strong leads the president had in states like Georgia and Pennsylvania.

States have historically taken time after election day to tally all votes.

Trump continues baseless allegations

In an extraordinary assault on the democratic process, Trump appeared in the White House briefing room on Thursday evening and without basis alleged the election was being “stolen” from him.

Offering no evidence, Trump lambasted election workers and sharply criticized polling before the election that he said was designed to suppress the vote because it favoured Biden.

“They’re trying to rig an election, and we can’t let that happen,” said Trump, who spoke for about 15 minutes in the White House briefing room before leaving without taking questions. Several TV networks cut away during his remarks, with anchors saying they needed to correct his statements.

Biden, who earlier in the day urged patience as votes were counted, responded on Twitter: “No one is going to take our democracy away from us. Not now, not ever.”

With ballots still to be tabulated, Biden already had received more than 73 million votes, the most in U.S. history, while Trump had more than 69 million, about seven million more than in 2016. “Democracy is sometimes messy,” Biden said from Wilmington, Del. “It sometimes requires a bit of patience, too.”

WATCH | ‘Democracy is sometimes messy,’ Biden says: 

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden calls on Americans to be patient and calm as the final ballots are counted in crucial swing states. 1:14

And he reiterated that he feels good about where things stand and is confident he will be the winner when the count is complete. 

On Thursday, a Michigan judge dismissed a Trump campaign lawsuit in a dispute over whether Republican challengers had access to the handling of absentee ballots. The lawsuit claimed Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, a Democrat, was allowing absentee ballots to be counted without teams of bipartisan observers as well as challengers. 

Michigan First District Court of Appeals Judge Cynthia Stephens said that the lawsuit was filed late Wednesday afternoon, just hours before the last ballots were counted. She also said Benson was the wrong person to sue because she doesn’t control the logistics of local ballot counting even if she is the state’s chief election officer.

Much of the dispute centred on the TCF Center in Detroit where pro-Trump protesters gathered while absentee ballots were being counted.

WATCH | Trump supporters angry as race tightens in Georgia:

Donald Trump supporters protested in Georgia as the lead he initially had over Joe Biden dwindled as more ballots were counted, with some making claims about fraudulent ballots. 2:09

A judge in Georgia, where Trump and Biden were neck and neck Thursday night with 98 per cent of votes reported, also dismissed a lawsuit over the vote in that state late Wednesday. 

It was unclear if any of the Trump campaign’s legal manoeuvring over ballot counting would succeed in shifting the race in his favour. Late Thursday afternoon, the campaign said it had launched yet another lawsuit, this time against the Philadelphia board of electors, seeking an injunction to bar ballot counting unless Republican observers are present. 

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar said on Thursday afternoon that she was unaware of any allegations of voter fraud in her state as the final votes were being counted. 

WATCH | Pennsylvania’s secretary of state says it’s not yet clear who the winner is:

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar told reporters Thursday that several hundred thousand ballots remain to be counted in the state where results are highly anticipated amid a tight national electoral race. 0:54


What do you want to know about the U.S. election? Email us at Ask@cbc.ca.

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CBC | World News

As Biden gains ground, Trump again accuses Democrats, without evidence, of trying to ‘steal’ election

The latest:

  • Electoral college vote stands at 253 for Biden, 214 for Trump.
  • Election observer says no evidence for Trump’s fraud claims.
  • Michigan, Georgia judges dismiss Trump campaign lawsuits.
  • Get all the U.S. election results as they come in.
  • How the electoral college determines who wins the U.S. presidency.
  • What do you want to know about the U.S. election? Email us at Ask@cbc.ca.

Despite the fact votes are still being counted and there has been no winner declared in the election yet by any media organization, U.S. President Donald Trump renewed his unfounded claim Thursday evening that Democrats are trying to “steal” the election from him. He did not back up his allegation with any evidence.

“If you count the illegal votes, they can try to steal the election from us,” Trump said, suggesting votes were being counted that were cast after election day. 

State and federal officials have not reported any instances of widespread voter fraud.

Trump spoke from the White House briefing room, unleashing harsh criticism of pre-election polling that showed him trailing Democrat Joe Biden and claiming the ballot-counting process is unfair and corrupt.

“This is a case when they are trying to steal an election, they are trying to rig an election, and we can’t let that happen,” Trump said of the Democrats, whom he accused of corruption while providing no evidence.

He also vowed to fight the election in court, perhaps right up to the Supreme Court. 

WATCH | Trump makes unfounded allegations about  “illegal” votes:

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump told reporters Thursday only ‘legal’ votes should be counted in the U.S. election and suggested some votes were cast after Nov. 3 despite no evidence of that. 0:55

The ballot-counting process across the country has been running smoothly, according to state election officials, and the count is ongoing in several battleground states.

“If America needed a wake-up call about how dangerous Donald Trump is, they got it tonight,” Anthony Scaramucci told CBC News. Scaramucci worked in the White House as Trump’s communications director for 11 days and has been openly critical of Trump since he left the White House. 

Biden tweeted in response, saying, “No one is going to take our democracy away from us.” 


Earlier in the day, a Michigan judge dismissed a Trump campaign lawsuit in a dispute over whether Republican challengers had access to the handling of absentee ballots. The lawsuit claimed Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, a Democrat, was allowing absentee ballots to be counted without teams of bipartisan observers as well as challengers. 

Judge Cynthia Stephens said that the lawsuit was filed late Wednesday afternoon, just hours before the last ballots were counted. She also said the defendant was the wrong person to sue because she doesn’t control the logistics of local ballot counting, even if she is the state’s chief election officer.

Much of the dispute centred on the TCF Center in Detroit where pro-Trump protesters gathered while absentee ballots were being counted.

A judge in Georgia also dismissed a lawsuit over the vote in that state late Wednesday. It was unclear if any of the Trump campaign’s legal manoeuvring over ballot counting would succeed in shifting the race in his favour. Late Thursday afternoon, the campaign said it had launched yet another lawsuit, this time against the Philadelphia board of electors, seeking an injunction to bar ballot counting unless Republican observers are present. 


Meanwhile, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden pushed closer to the 270 electoral college votes needed to carry the White House, securing victories in the “blue wall” battlegrounds of Wisconsin and Michigan and narrowing U.S. President Donald Trump’s path.

Biden’s victories in the Great Lakes states left him with 253 electoral votes, while Trump has 214.

Biden also holds narrow leads in Nevada and Arizona, while Trump was watching his slim advantage fade in must-win states Pennsylvania and Georgia as mail-in and absentee votes were being counted. The Associated Press and Fox News have called Arizona for Biden, but CBC News still considers it too close to call and is waiting to make the determination.

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar said on Thursday afternoon that she was unaware of any allegations of voter fraud in her state as the final votes were being counted. 

WATCH | Pennsylvania’s secretary of state says it’s not yet clear who the winner is:

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar told reporters Thursday that several hundred thousand ballots remain to be counted in the state where results are highly anticipated amid a tight national electoral race. 0:54

Biden called for calm Thursday afternoon as the final votes are counted.

“Democracy is sometimes messy,” he said from Wilmington, Del. “It sometimes requires a bit of patience, too.”

And he reiterated that he feels good about where things stand and is confident he will be the winner when the count is complete. 

With millions of ballots yet to be tabulated, Biden already had received more than 71 million votes, the most in U.S. history.

WATCH | Biden says he feels good about where things stand: 

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden calls on Americans to be patient and calm as the final ballots are counted in crucial swing states. 1:14

As of Thursday afternoon, Arizona state officials said about 450,000 ballots remain to be counted, while an election official in Georgia said more than 47,000 votes are still to be counted.

“The effort here is to make sure that everybody’s legal vote is counted properly and that the actual results are reflective of the voters’ intent,” said Gabriel Sterling, a voting system manager in Atlanta. “These close elections require us to be diligent and make sure we do everything right.”


Trump clung to a narrow lead in North Carolina as well, another must-win for him. Trump had to win the states where he was still ahead and either Arizona or Nevada to triumph and avoid becoming the first incumbent U.S. president to lose a re-election bid since fellow Republican George H.W. Bush in 1992.

WATCH | Why one Native American woman says she supported Biden:

Allie Young is a member of the Navajo Nation who says she voted for Joe Biden because of his concern about climate change and his desire to strengthen the U.S. government’s relationship with her nation. 7:13

Nevada official responds to Trump campaign allegations

In Las Vegas, Trump allies alleged, without evidence, that there had been voting irregularities in populous Clark County, which includes the city. Former Nevada attorney general Adam Laxalt, a Republican, said a lawsuit would be filed in federal court to ask the judge to “stop the counting of improper votes.”

On Thursday, Clark County, Nev., election official Joe Gloria told reporters, “We are unaware of any improper ballots that are being processed.”

He said the counting is slow because there are far more mail-in ballots this year than in previous elections, and that the U.S. Postal Service will continue to deliver all ballots postmarked on or before Nov. 3 through Nov. 10.

WATCH | Clark County official explains why counting is slower than usual:

Clark County, Nev., election official Joe Gloria explains why counting ballots in his county, which contains Las Vegas, is taking so long. 1:06  

Bob Bauer, a senior adviser to Biden’s campaign, called the various Trump lawsuits “meritless” and designed to undermine the integrity of the electoral process.

In Georgia, a judge dismissed a different lawsuit by that state’s Republican Party and Trump’s campaign that asked him to ensure a coastal county was following state laws on processing absentee ballots.

Chatham County Superior Court Judge James Bass did not provide an explanation for his decision at the close of a roughly one-hour hearing. The county includes the heavily Democratic city of Savannah.

WATCH | Result of U.S. presidential election remains unknown:

The CBC’s Ellen Mauro has the latest from Washington on the race for the White House two days after the vote. 4:42

An appeals court in Pennsylvania on Thursday ordered that Trump campaign officials be allowed to more closely observe ballot processing in Philadelphia. Statewide recounts in Wisconsin, meanwhile, have historically changed the vote tally by only a few hundred votes; Biden led by more than 20,000 ballots out of nearly 3.3 million counted.

Election observer says no evidence for Trump’s claims

The head of an international delegation monitoring the U.S. election said his team has no evidence to support Trump’s claims about alleged fraud involving mail-in absentee ballots.

Michael Georg Link, a German lawmaker who heads an observer mission of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), told German public broadcaster rbb Thursday that “on the election day itself, we couldn’t see any violations” at the U.S. polling places they visited.

WATCH | No obvious legal grounds to stop vote count, law professor says:

University of Memphis law professor Steve Mulroy says vote recounts are common in the U.S. but stopping a count in any state would be a significant legal hurdle for President Donald Trump. 6:35

Link said he was “very surprised” by Trump’s claims about postal ballot fraud because the United States has a long history of this method of voting going back to the 19th century. The Vienna-based OSCE, of which the U.S. is a member, conducts observer missions at major elections in all of its member countries.

“We looked into this. We found no violations of the rules whatsoever,” Link told rbb. He said neither U.S. election observers nor media found any evidence of fraud either, though the OSCE team on Wednesday repeated long-standing concerns about disenfranchisement of some voters and the distorting effects of campaign finance laws.

Trump used his Twitter feed to falsely claim victory in several key states and amplify unsubstantiated conspiracy theories about Democratic gains as absentee and early votes were tabulated.

He weighed in again on Twitter on Thursday, writing: “Stop the count!” Twitter later flagged a different Trump tweet as disputed and possibly misleading; Trump tweeted that “any vote that came in after election day will not be counted.”


Several states allow mailed-in votes to be accepted after election day as long as they were postmarked by Tuesday. That includes Pennsylvania, where ballots postmarked by Nov. 3 can be accepted if they arrive up to three days later. 

WATCH | Trump will not concede, U.S. politics professor maintains:

Scott Lucas, American politics professor at the University of Birmingham, believes no matter what happens next in the U.S. presidential election, President Donald Trump will not concede and that will bring considerable risk to the country.   1:21


What do you want to know about the U.S. election? Email us at Ask@cbc.ca.

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CBC | World News

China’s economy accelerates as virus recovery gains strength

China’s shaky economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic is gaining strength as consumers return to shopping malls and auto dealerships while the United States and Europe endure painful contractions.

Growth in the world’s second-largest economy accelerated to 4.9 per cent over a year earlier in the three months ending in September, up from the previous quarter’s 3.2 per cent, official data showed Monday. Retail spending rebounded to above pre-virus levels for the first time and factory output rose, boosted by demand for exports of masks and other medical supplies.

Growth ‘still accelerating’

China is the only major economy that is expected to grow this year while activity in the United States, Europe and Japan shrinks.

The recovery is “broadening out and becoming less reliant” on government stimulus, Julian Evans-Pritchard of Capital Economics said in a report. He said growth is “still accelerating” heading into the present quarter.

Most Asian stock markets rose on the news of increased activity in China, the biggest trading partner for all of its neighbours. Japan’s Nikkei 225 index added 1.1 per cent while Hong Kong’s Hang Seng climbed 0.9 per cent. Markets in South Korea and Australia also rose.

China’s benchmark Shanghai Composite Index lost 0.7 per cent on expectations the relatively strong data will reduce the likelihood of additional stimulus that might boost share prices.

Warning on international economy

China, where the pandemic began in December, became the first major economy to return to growth after the ruling Communist Party declared the disease under control in March and began reopening factories, shops and offices.

The economy contracted by 6.8 per cent in the first quarter, its worst performance since at least the mid-1960s, before rebounding.

The economy “continued the steady recovery,” the National Bureau of Statistics said in a report. However, it warned, “the international environment is still complicated and severe.” It said China faces great pressure to prevent a resurgence of the virus.


A worker is seen on scaffoldings at a construction site of a residential compound in Beijing on Monday. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

Authorities have lifted curbs on travel and business but visitors to government and other public buildings still are checked for the virus’s telltale fever. Travellers arriving from abroad must be quarantined for two weeks.

Last week, more than 10 million people were tested for the virus in the eastern port of Qingdao after 12 cases were found there. That broke a two-month streak with no virus transmissions reported within China.

Industrial production rose 5.8 per cent over the same quarter last year, a marked improvement over the first half’s 1.3 per cent contraction. Chinese exporters are taking market share from foreign competitors that still are hampered by anti-virus controls.

Retail sales rose 0.9 per cent over a year earlier. That was up from a 7.2 per cent contraction in the first half as consumers, already anxious about a slowing economy and a tariff war with Washington, put off buying. Online commerce rose 15.3 per cent.

In a sign demand is accelerating, sales in September rose 3.3 per cent.

“China’s recovery in private consumption is gathering momentum,” said Stephen Innes of AxiCorp in a report.

Economists say China is likely to recover faster than other major economies due to the ruling party’s decision to impose the most intensive anti-disease measures in history. Those temporarily cut off most access to cities with a total of 60 million people.

The International Monetary Fund is forecasting China’s economic growth at 1.8 per cent this year while the U.S. economy is expected to shrink by 4.3 per cent. The IMF expects a 9.8 per cent contraction in France, 6 per cent in Germany and 5.3 per cent in Japan.

Private sector analysts say as much as 30 per cent of China’s urban workforce, or up to 130 million people, may have lost their jobs at least temporarily. They say as many as 25 million jobs might be lost for good this year.

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CBC | World News

Rumors Point Towards Remarkable Gains for AMD’s Upcoming ‘Big Navi’ GPUs

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There’s been a lot of debate in the past 12 months over whether RDNA2 would deliver a huge improvement over RDNA. The Radeon 5700 and 5700 XT were significant leaps forward for AMD’s products, but they failed to cleanly beat Turing on absolute power efficiency, and while they challenged Nvidia’s RTX GPUs, they weren’t enough to deliver knockout blows. RDNA was important because it demonstrated that after years of iterating on GCN, AMD was still capable of delivering significant advances in GPU technology.

AMD raised eyebrows when it claimed RDNA2 would offer a 1.5x performance per watt improvement over RDNA, in the same way RDNA had improved dramatically over GCN. Generally speaking, such dramatic improvements only come from node shrinks, not additional GPUs built on the same node. Nvidia’s Maxwell is probably the best example of a GPU family that improved over its predecessor without a node change, and the gap between Maxwell and Kepler was smaller than the gap between Pascal and Maxwell, as far as power efficiency improvements and performance gains.

If you increase something by 1.5x twice, your gain over baseline is 2.25x. AMD’s graph conforms to that relative improvement if you measure the heights of the graph bars in pixels.

There are rumors going around that Big Navi might dramatically faster than expected, with performance estimated at 1.95x – 2.25x higher than the 5700 XT. This would be an astonishing feat, to put it mildly. The slideshow below shows our test results from the 5700 XT and 5700. The 5700 XT matched the RTX 2070 (and sometimes the 2080) well, while the 5700 was modestly faster than the RTX 2060 for a slightly higher price. A 1.95 – 2.25x speed improvement would catapult Big Navi into playable frame rates even on the most demanding settings we test; 18fps in Metro Exodus at Extreme Detail and 4K becomes 35-41 fps depending on which multiplier you choose. I have no idea how Big Navi would compare against Ampere at that point, but it would handily blow past the RTX 2080 Ti.

Evaluating the Chances of an AMD Surge

Let’s examine the likelihood of AMD delivering a massive improvement of the sort contemplated by these rumors. On the “Pro” side:

  • AMD has openly declared that it’s trying to deliver a Ryzen-equivalent improvement on the GPU side of its business. As I noted back when RDNA debuted, it’s not fair to judge GCN-RDNA the same way we judged Bulldozer-Ryzen. AMD had five years to work on Ryzen, while the gap from RX Vega 64 to RDNA wasn’t even two.
  • AMD claims to have improved power efficiency by 1.5x with RDNA, and our comparisons between the Radeon RX 5700 and the Radeon Vega 64 back up this claim. The Radeon 5700 delivers 48fps in 1080p in Metro Last Light Exodus and draws an average of 256W during the fixed-duration workload. The Radeon Vega 64 hit 43fps and drew an average of 347W. That works out to an overall performance-per-watt improvement of ~1.5x.
  • Rumors around Big Navi have generally pointed to a GPU with between 72-80 CUs. That’s a 1.8x – 2x improvement, and it makes the claim of 1.95x – 2.25x more likely on the face of it. Nvidia has not been increasing its core counts generation on generation by this much. The 980 Ti had 2,816 GPU cores, the 1080 Ti packed 3,584 and the 2080 Ti has 4,352. Nvidia has been increasing its GPU core count by about 1.2x per cycle.
  • The PlayStation 5’s GPU core clocks remarkably high for a GPU, at over 2GHz. If we assume that the specified 2.23GHz boost clock for the PS5 is equivalent to the boost clock for RDNA2’s top-end GPU’s with the game clock a little lower, we’d be looking at a 1755MHz Game Clock on 5700 XT versus a 2.08GHz game clock on the Radeon RX Next. That’s a 1.18x gain. A 1.18x gain in clock speed plus a 1.8x gain in CU count = 2.124x improved performance. Pretty much bang on estimated target. A 1.18x IPC improvement without any clock increase (or a mix of the two) could also deliver this benefit.

And the cons?

A 1.5x performance per watt improvement is the kind of gain we typically associate with new process nodes. Nvidia pulled this level of improvement once with Maxwell. The GTX 980 Ti was an average of 1.47x faster than the GTX 780 Ti at the same power draw. AMD never delivered this kind of performance-per-watt leap with GCN over the seven years that architecture drove their GPUs, though GCN absolutely became more power-efficient over time.

Running GPUs at high clock speeds tends to blow their power curves, as the Radeon Nano illustrated against the Radeon Fury five years ago. In order for RDNA2 to deliver the kind of improvements contemplated, it needs to be 1.8x – 2x the size while simultaneously increasing clock without destroying its own power efficiency gains. That’s a difficult, though not impossible trick.

Promising a 1.5x improvement in performance per watt — the one piece of information AMD has confirmed — doesn’t tell us whether that gain is coming from the “performance” side of the equation or the “wattage” side. For example, the GTX 980 Ti and the GTX 780 Ti have virtually the same power consumption under load. In that case, the 1.47x improvement came entirely from better performance in the same power envelope. If AMD delivered a successor to the 5700 XT that drew 197W instead of 295W but offered exactly the same performance, it could also claim a 1.5x improvement in performance-per-watt without having improved its actual real-world performance at all. I don’t think this is actually likely, but it illustrates that improvements to performance per watt don’t necessarily require any performance improvements at all.

I haven’t addressed the question of IPC at all, but I want to touch on it here. When Nvidia launched Turing, it paid a significant penalty in die size and power consumption relative to a GPU with an equivalent number of cores, TMUs, and ROPs but without the tensor cores and RT cores. What does that mean for AMD? I don’t know.

The Nvidia and AMD / ATI GPUs of any given generation almost always prove to respond differently to certain types of workloads in at least a few significant ways. In 2007, I wrote an article for Ars Technica that mentioned how the 3DMark pixel shader test could cause Nvidia power consumption to surge.

Certain feature tests could cause one company’s GPU power consumption to spike but not the others. Image by Ars Technica.

I later found a different 3DMark test (I can’t recall which one, and it may have been in a different version of the application) that caused AMD’s power consumption to similarly surge far past Nvidia.

Sometimes, AMD and Nvidia implement more-or-less the same solution to a problem. Sometimes they build GPUs with fundamental capabilities (like asynchronous computing or ray tracing) that their competitor doesn’t support yet. It’s possible that AMD’s implementation of ray tracing in RDNA2 will look similar to Nvidia’s in terms of complexity and power consumption penalty. It’s also possible that it’ll more closely resemble whatever Nvidia debuts with Ampere, or be AMD’s unique take on how to approach the ray tracing efficiency problem.

The point is, we don’t know. It’s possible that RDNA’s improvements over RDNA1 consist of much better power efficiency, higher clocks, more CUs, and ray tracing as opposed to any further IPC gains. It’s also possible AMD has another IPC jump in store.

The tea leaves and indirect rumors from sources suggest, at minimum, that RDNA2 should sweep past the RTX 2000 family in terms of both power efficiency and performance. I don’t want to speculate on exactly what those gains or efficiencies will be or where they’ll come from, but current scuttlebutt is that it’ll be a competitive high-end battle between AMD and Nvidia this time around. I hope so, if only because we haven’t seen the two companies truly go toe-to-toe at the highest end of the market since ~2013.

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ExtremeTechGaming – ExtremeTech

Hurricane Dorian gains strength as Florida braces for its arrival

Hurricane Dorian is expected to suck powerful fuel from the warm waters off the Florida coast, swelling into a dangerous Category 4 storm in the coming days before it slams into the state early next week, forecasts showed on Friday.

The Miami-based National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued a hurricane watch for northwestern Bahamas on Friday, and said the risk of “devastating hurricane-force winds along the Florida east coast late this weekend and early next week continues to increase.”

NHC posted an update Friday morning on the hurricane menacing the U.S. mainland.

“Dorian is likely to remain an extremely dangerous hurricane while it moves near the northwestern Bahamas and approaches the Florida peninsula through the weekend.”


The storm began Friday over the Atlantic at Category 2, but was already expected to reach Category 3 later in the day, with sustained winds of at least 178 km/h.

The entire state of Florida is under a declaration of emergency and Governor Ron DeSantis has activated 2,500 National Guard troops, with another 1,500 on standby.

Forecasters predict the storm will grow more ferocious as it slows its advance across the warm waters near the coast, striking land late on Monday or early Tuesday. Tropical storm winds could be felt in Florida as soon as Saturday evening.

No evacuations were ordered as of early Friday, but they’re expected as the storm’s path become clearer before it makes landfall.

If it reaches Category 4 by Sunday, its winds will blow at more than 210 km/h. Its 9 km/h march across the map could slow down to 6 km/h. The slower it moves, the more time it has to draw fuel from the warm seas.

Recent weather models from the National Hurricane Center show it smacking into the centre of the state. It was trending slightly south in the latest advisory issued at 5 a.m. Friday.


It could roll inland towards Orlando on Tuesday or early Wednesday, weakening as it moves away from the sea. Other NHC weather models show it tracking south toward Miami before it hits the peninsula, or heading north to the Georgia coast.

Along with the dangerous winds, the storm is expected to drop 12 to 25 centimetres of rain on the state, with some areas getting as much as 38 centimetres.

“This rainfall may cause life-threatening flash floods,” NHC forecasters said.

U.S. President Donald Trump cancelled a trip to Poland, sending Vice-President Mike Pence in his place, to ensure resources are properly directed for the storm.

“Now it’s looking like it could be an absolute monster,” Trump said in a video posted on Twitter, adding that food and water were being shipped to Florida.


DeSantis said Floridians need to take the storm seriously.

“Hurricane #Dorian is moving slowly & gaining strength,” DeSantis wrote on Twitter. “Now is the time to get prepared & have a plan.”

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp declared a state of emergency in 12 counties to assist with storm readiness, response and recovery.

‘Not looking good’


Category 1-strength winds bend palm trees as Hurricane Dorian slams into St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, on Wednesday in this still image taken from social media video. (Cassandra Crichlow/Reuters)

Angela Johnson, a 39-year-old bar manager in South Florida, said on Thursday: “We’re worried. This is not looking good for us.

“We woke up a lot more scared than we went to bed last night, and the news is not getting any better,” said Johnson, who manages Coconuts On The Beach, a bar and restaurant on the surfing beach in the town of Cocoa Beach.

Officials were making piles of sand available for Cocoa Beach residents to fill sandbags starting on Friday.

Dorian could churn across dozens of launchpads owned by NASA, the U.S. Air Force and companies such as Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin.

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‘A new Europe’: Far right makes big gains in high-turnout EU parliament elections

Europeans woke Monday to a new political reality after European Parliament elections ended the domination of the EU’s main centre-right and centre-left parties and revealed a changed political landscape where the far-right, pro-business groups and environmentalists will be forces to be reckoned with.

Turning out in numbers not seen for 20 years, voters took their concerns about immigration and security to the ballot box, making parties led by the likes of Italy’s populist Matteo Salvini and France’s far-right leader Marine Le Pen among the biggest in the 28-nation bloc’s assembly.

“The rules are changing in Europe,” Salvini, Italy’s hard-line interior minister, said at his League party headquarters in Milan early Monday. “A new Europe is born.”

Voter projections showed the League won 33 per cent of the vote, up from just six per cent at the last European vote in 2014.

The lion’s share of Britain’s seats went to Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party, as citizens punished the governing conservatives and opposition Labour party for their embarrassing failure to manage the divided country’s delayed departure from the EU.

Riding what they called Europe’s “green wave” backed by Europe-wide rallies urging climate action, environmentalist parties made strong gains, notably in Germany, one of the continent’s main forces for EU integration.

Provisional results showed the Greens’ bloc coming fourth with 70 seats, an increase of 18 compared with 2014.

The free-market liberals saw their stake in the 751-seat parliament rise to 107 seats, from 68 in 2014.

‘Shrinking centre’

The picture of a fractured assembly for the next five years was complete as many citizens turned their backs on the centre-right European People’s Party — one of its key figures, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, saw her party lose ground — and the centre-left Socialists.

“We are facing a shrinking centre of the European Union parliament,” a subdued EPP lead candidate Manfred Weber said, after just over 50 per cent of the EU’s more than 400 million voters had turned out over four days in the world’s biggest transnational elections. “From now on, those who want to have a strong European Union have to join forces.”

The Socialist lead candidate, Frans Timmermans, essentially conceded defeat, even though the two groups remain the assembly’s biggest by some margin.

“If you lose an election, if you lose seats, you have to be modest,” the former Dutch foreign minister said. “We have lost seats and this means that we have to be humble.”


Marine Le Pen speaks to the press after the announcement of initial results. (Bertrand Guy/AFP/Getty Images)

Spanish caretaker Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez was a notable exception, as his victorious Socialists looked set to win 20 of the country’s 54 seats in the European Parliament.

Although still trickling in, results show that the EPP is set to secure 179 seats, down from 217 five years ago. The Socialists are slated to win 150, down from 187.

The two parties have dominated the parliament with a combined majority since elections were first held in 1979. Senior figures from the EPP hold the top posts in the EU’s three main institutions: parliament president, head of the EU’s powerful executive commission and European Council president, who chairs summits of European presidents and prime ministers.

While real power in Europe remains in the hands of the 28 member states, the assembly’s influence has grown. It’s helped improve air flight safety in Europe, cut down on plastics use, end mobile telephone roaming charges inside the bloc, boost data privacy, and cut carbon dioxide emissions from cars.

The parliament also has an important say in international treaties ranging from trade talks to Brexit.

But now new, uncomfortable alliances must be forged. The pro-business liberals, or ALDE, backed by French President Emmanuel Macron, insist that Europe’s traditional political certainties are a thing of the past.

Some evidence of that could be seen with Le Pen’s National Rally apparent capture of one more seat than Macron’s La République En Marche (Republic on the Move), with 24 of France’s 74 in the European parliament, according to an exit poll.

“The monopoly of power has been broken,” said ALDE lead candidate Margrethe Vestager, currently the EU’s competition commissioner, describing Sunday’s polls as “a signal for change.”

Chancellor Sebastian Kurz’s centre-right party recorded a big win, but he was ousted Monday following the collapse of his scandal-tainted coalition.

In Belgium, an extreme right, anti-immigrant party made a massive surge in Dutch-speaking Flanders, while the Greens made fresh inroads in francophone Wallonia and Brussels.

Greece’s ruling left-wing party fared so poorly that Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras called snap national elections, likely to be held in June. The opposition conservatives did best, while the extreme-right Golden Dawn lost support.

The centre-left pulled off a surprise victory in the Netherlands, while Geert Wilders’ right-wing populists lost all four of their seats.

The governing Socialists ended up as Spain’s winner in the EU vote. Three Catalan separatist leaders were elected but will have trouble taking their seats because one is in jail and two are fugitives.

Party group leaders begin their horse-trading Monday to see what kind of stable alliance can be established and who might secure the EU’s top jobs. Their decisions will set the stage for EU leaders, who meet over dinner Tuesday to see where the political pieces lie and discuss potential candidates.

“We are facing a shrinking centre,” said a subdued Manfred Weber, a candidate for the European Commission presidency on behalf of the European People’s Party, the main centre-right group in the EU parliament.

 “From now on, those who want to have a strong European Union have to join forces.”

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Steam Hardware Survey Shows GPU Gains for AMD, Mixed Turing Results

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We’ve been tracking the monthly updates of the Steam Hardware Survey to create a more detailed window into the GPU replacement cycle than we’ve typically provided in the past. There are a number of interesting trends currently playing out in the GPU market. Nvidia is the midst of an all-hands-on-deck effort to convince gamers that ray tracing is the Next Big Thing and that its Turing GPUs represent a worthwhile investment, even considering their increased costs relative to previous generations. AMD has aggressively positioned its lower-end GPUsSEEAMAZON_ET_135 See Amazon ET commerce to combat Pascal and Turing, with a lot of market buzz around 7nm and its upcoming Navi family. So how are consumers responding to these arguments?

Probably not as well as Nvidia would like, though the company remains the overwhelming player in the gaming GPU market. According to Steam, Nvidia’s overall market share is ~75 percent, with 10 percent of gamers on Intel solutions, and 14.7 percent using AMD. There’s a little good news for AMD in these results that we’ll discuss as well. First, though, let’s check out the state of Turing versus Pascal.

The slideshow below compares the percentage of Steam users with a given GPU, measured in the months after that GPU launched. There’s a 0 percent period in the graphs to show the time lag between when cards debut and when they actually appear in the Steam Hardware Survey. If a GPU launches in May, May is considered to be Month 1 of launch. The RTX 2080 and 2070SEEAMAZON_ET_135 See Amazon ET commerce use a 7-month period to reflect the time since launch, while the RTX 2060 uses a three-month window (it launched in January).

I’ve dropped the 1080 Ti from these comparisons because the Steam Hardware Survey suffered a major discontinuity in terms of the data set back in August 2017, and we’re now bumping into that period relative to the 1080 Ti’s launch window.

Because Turing GPUs sell at higher prices than their Pascal counterparts, we’ve also included price-matched comparisons that compare cards based on their actual price rather than branding. In these cases, the GTX 1080 is compared against the RTX 2070 and the GTX 1070 takes on the RTX 2060.

The entire data table is shown below:

Turing-versus-Pascal-Table-March

So, what do we see in aggregate? Mixed results. The gap between the 1080 and 2080 widened by a fraction, but scarcely enough to notice. The gap between the 1070 and the 2070, on the other hand, exploded. Adoption of the GTX 1070 surged once the cards were widely available in-market, while the RTX 2070 has yet to benefit from an equivalent leap. The GTX 1080 versus RTX 2070 comparison shows improvement, with the RTX 2070 gaining on the GTX 1080 as far as current adoption at the same place in their respective life cycles. This is good news for Nvidia.

The RTX 2060 similarly shows mixed results. Steam appears to have a cutoff at roughly 0.15 percent when it comes to whether a GPU rates being included on the survey. The RTX 2060 hits this adoption rate more quickly than any other RTX card, appearing in our survey in the third month post-launch. As you can see, none of the other Turing GPUs hit this point until Month 4. It also enters the survey at the highest adoption rate — 0.27 percent, compared with 0.22 percent for the 2080 and 0.17 percent for the RTX 2070. Again, this is a sign of increased uptake and better sales.

But while the RTX 2060 has had the best introduction of any Turing GPU judged on SHS adoption, it doesn’t hold a candle to either the original GTX 1060 or the GTX 1070. The availability of multiple GTX 1060 SKUs complicates this story, which is another reason why the GTX 1070 may be the better RTX 2060 comparison. Even here, however, the GTX 1070 is decisively ahead.

Nvidia has said that Turing drove far more revenue than Pascal during the early days of launch, and that may be true. Nevertheless, the best public data source available suggests that Turing has not been as widely adopted by the gaming community as Pascal was at the same point in its life cycle.

Modest Gains for AMD

AMD has been aggressively positioning its Radeon GPUs for months, and those price cuts are paying off. The RX 580 was the third-largest mover on Steam this month, jumping 0.16 percent for a total market share of 1.1 percent. To put that in perspective, however, the RX 580 is currently listed as the most popular AMD GPU on Steam.

AMD-Radeon-RX-580

Not actually all that popular.

The RX 570 grew modestly, at 0.06 percent, for a total market penetration of 0.34 percent. RX Vega launched in August 2017 but only appeared on the Steam Hardware Survey in January 2019 at 0.16 percent. Now the two GPUs are up to 0.22 percent share. It is unclear whether this includes the Radeon VII.

One point these comparisons hammer home is just how lopsided the GPU market currently is. It’s absolutely fair to compare Turing and Pascal or to discuss the overall GPU market in 2016 versus 2019, but right now, Nvidia doesn’t have much competition. It’s going to take more than price cuts for AMD to reverse its current market share.

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Steam Hardware Survey Shows GPU Gains for AMD, Mixed Turing Results

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We’ve been tracking the monthly updates of the Steam Hardware Survey to create a more detailed window into the GPU replacement cycle than we’ve typically provided in the past. There are a number of interesting trends currently playing out in the GPU market. Nvidia is the midst of an all-hands-on-deck effort to convince gamers that ray tracing is the Next Big Thing and that its Turing GPUs represent a worthwhile investment, even considering their increased costs relative to previous generations. AMD has aggressively positioned its lower-end GPUsSEEAMAZON_ET_135 See Amazon ET commerce to combat Pascal and Turing, with a lot of market buzz around 7nm and its upcoming Navi family. So how are consumers responding to these arguments?

Probably not as well as Nvidia would like, though the company remains the overwhelming player in the gaming GPU market. According to Steam, Nvidia’s overall market share is ~75 percent, with 10 percent of gamers on Intel solutions, and 14.7 percent using AMD. There’s a little good news for AMD in these results that we’ll discuss as well. First, though, let’s check out the state of Turing versus Pascal.

The slideshow below compares the percentage of Steam users with a given GPU, measured in the months after that GPU launched. There’s a 0 percent period in the graphs to show the time lag between when cards debut and when they actually appear in the Steam Hardware Survey. If a GPU launches in May, May is considered to be Month 1 of launch. The RTX 2080 and 2070SEEAMAZON_ET_135 See Amazon ET commerce use a 7-month period to reflect the time since launch, while the RTX 2060 uses a three-month window (it launched in January).

I’ve dropped the 1080 Ti from these comparisons because the Steam Hardware Survey suffered a major discontinuity in terms of the data set back in August 2017, and we’re now bumping into that period relative to the 1080 Ti’s launch window.

Because Turing GPUs sell at higher prices than their Pascal counterparts, we’ve also included price-matched comparisons that compare cards based on their actual price rather than branding. In these cases, the GTX 1080 is compared against the RTX 2070 and the GTX 1070 takes on the RTX 2060.

The entire data table is shown below:

Turing-versus-Pascal-Table-March

So, what do we see in aggregate? Mixed results. The gap between the 1080 and 2080 widened by a fraction, but scarcely enough to notice. The gap between the 1070 and the 2070, on the other hand, exploded. Adoption of the GTX 1070 surged once the cards were widely available in-market, while the RTX 2070 has yet to benefit from an equivalent leap. The GTX 1080 versus RTX 2070 comparison shows improvement, with the RTX 2070 gaining on the GTX 1080 as far as current adoption at the same place in their respective life cycles. This is good news for Nvidia.

The RTX 2060 similarly shows mixed results. Steam appears to have a cutoff at roughly 0.15 percent when it comes to whether a GPU rates being included on the survey. The RTX 2060 hits this adoption rate more quickly than any other RTX card, appearing in our survey in the third month post-launch. As you can see, none of the other Turing GPUs hit this point until Month 4. It also enters the survey at the highest adoption rate — 0.27 percent, compared with 0.22 percent for the 2080 and 0.17 percent for the RTX 2070. Again, this is a sign of increased uptake and better sales.

But while the RTX 2060 has had the best introduction of any Turing GPU judged on SHS adoption, it doesn’t hold a candle to either the original GTX 1060 or the GTX 1070. The availability of multiple GTX 1060 SKUs complicates this story, which is another reason why the GTX 1070 may be the better RTX 2060 comparison. Even here, however, the GTX 1070 is decisively ahead.

Nvidia has said that Turing drove far more revenue than Pascal during the early days of launch, and that may be true. Nevertheless, the best public data source available suggests that Turing has not been as widely adopted by the gaming community as Pascal was at the same point in its life cycle.

Modest Gains for AMD

AMD has been aggressively positioning its Radeon GPUs for months, and those price cuts are paying off. The RX 580 was the third-largest mover on Steam this month, jumping 0.16 percent for a total market share of 1.1 percent. To put that in perspective, however, the RX 580 is currently listed as the most popular AMD GPU on Steam.

AMD-Radeon-RX-580

Not actually all that popular.

The RX 570 grew modestly, at 0.06 percent, for a total market penetration of 0.34 percent. RX Vega launched in August 2017 but only appeared on the Steam Hardware Survey in January 2019 at 0.16 percent. Now the two GPUs are up to 0.22 percent share. It is unclear whether this includes the Radeon VII.

One point these comparisons hammer home is just how lopsided the GPU market currently is. It’s absolutely fair to compare Turing and Pascal or to discuss the overall GPU market in 2016 versus 2019, but right now, Nvidia doesn’t have much competition. It’s going to take more than price cuts for AMD to reverse its current market share.

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Leaked Intel Gen 11 GPU Benchmarks Show Promising Gains Against AMD

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AMD’s integrated graphics are generally better than Intel’s. The discrepancy has existed since at least as far back as the nForce 2 chipset, and while the particulars have varied (Intel’s Crystal Well on-die EDRAM gave it better absolute performance at times, albeit at much higher prices), the end result rarely has. Historically, AMD has offered higher integrated GPU performance at the same price point compared with Intel. But that could change with Intel’s next-generation on-die GPUs, set to debut with Intel’s new Sunny Cove CPU architecture.

New leaked benchmarks show Intel’s Gen 11 GT2 solution benchmarking significantly higher than the old, Skylake-era Gen 9 core. Some of these gains are to be expected — the Skylake GPU core is essentially four years old already — but the overall level of improvement is quite good in its own right.

Reddit user Dylan522p compiled leaked benchmarks into charts, shown below. The first chart compares Intel’s i5-8250U with UHD Graphics (GT2) against an unidentified Intel CPU in a GT2 configuration with Iris Plus Graphics 940. Note that since we don’t know anything about the thermal limits imposed on this test CPU, we also don’t know if it’s fair to compare the 8250U with this chip as opposed to a desktop-socketed part. This may overstate the performance improvement slightly.

Intel-vs-Intel-Graph

Graphs by Dylan522p

The gains here are very strong. Performance more than doubles in the Aztec Ruins tests (a video of the Aztec Ruins benchmark is embedded below, though this doesn’t show the benchmark run off this specific hardware, only the test itself). Older scenes still see significant performance improvements, and we’re far from launch day, with silicon and drivers both in active development.

The second graph compares the Intel solution to the AMD Ryzen platform, with data from a 2700U (15W) and a Ryzen 2400G (65W)SEEAMAZON_ET_135 See Amazon ET commerce. In the absence of information to confirm that the Intel CPU is a laptop chip actually running within its specified TDP, I’m going to assume that the 2400G is actually the better point of comparison for the core. Even here, it’s clear that the Gen 11 Intel GPU could be potent competition for Ryzen 2400G, at least if these tests are accurate.

Intel-vs-AMD-Graph

Graphs by Dylan522p

Of course, there are questions about how well GFXBench performance will translate into shipping titles and how effectively Intel will compete on price. We’re hearing rumors that Ice Lake systems could actually be on store shelves by this summer rather than being delayed into the holiday season. AMD’s third-generation Ryzen 3000 APUs are still 12nm products, not 7nm, and they don’t offer much more than small speed bumps and some utilization improvements over previous parts. We don’t know yet how much additional performance to expect, but most estimates are on the modest side. AMD undoubtedly has a 7nm APU in the works, but the company has said it won’t use the literal Matisse design with a GPU chiplet onboard instead of a second CPU die to launch the product.

While we won’t draw conclusions about Gen 11 performance until we have silicon and drivers to test, it ultimately isn’t surprising to see Intel closing the gap with AMD. If Chipzilla is serious about using its own architecture to build a GPU, it’s going to need to improve the performance of its own architecture, period. Since Gen 11 is positioned as a stepping stone to Xe, Intel’s discrete GPU hardware, we should expect to see substantial performance and performance-per-watt uplift. Nvidia doesn’t compete in integrated consumer graphics any longer, but both it and AMD scale their mainstream graphics architectures down into embedded products. Intel may have decided the best way to develop its own new architecture was to take a bottom-up approach and use it for relatively simple solutions first before scaling up into datacenters and gaming PCs.

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