Tag Archives: gets

Matt Dunstone gets an assist at Brier from small town in Saskatchewan

Matt Dunstone’s curling team continued to parlay the generosity of a Saskatchewan small town into its strong start at the Canadian men’s championship.

Dunstone’s foursome downed Quebec 9-6 on Tuesday for a third straight win. Saskatchewan was 4-1 in Pool B at the Tim Hortons Brier.

  • Watch and engage with CBC Sports’ That Curling Show live every day of The Brier at 7:30 p.m. ET on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, as well as streamed live on CBC Gem and CBCSports.ca

The COVID-19 pandemic decimating the competitive curling season and closing off ice time in certain regions of the country meant none of the 18 participating teams were in peak form upon arrival in Calgary.

Dunstone’s home club in Regina closed due to restrictions, a curling club in Wadena, population 1,300, offered itself up as an exclusive training base to the team.

Dunstone, vice Braeden Moskowy and front end Kirk Muyres and Dustin Kidby had the run of the Wadena Curling Club for two weeks before the Brier.

‘Huge advantage’

“We had two straight weeks of dialing in pretty much exactly how we wanted to throw the stone,” Dunstone said Tuesday.

“Huge advantage to us to be able to spend that amount of time doing exactly that. Not a whole lot of rust coming into this. We felt pretty confident in how we were throwing the rock.”

Ontario’s John Epping also won Tuesday to join Saskatchewan at 4-1 behind Kevin Koe’s Wild Card Two, which enjoyed a day off from the ice atop Pool B at 5-0.

THAT CURLING SHOW | Ben Hebert, Michael Fournier and Greg Smith join the show:

Hosts Colleen Joens and Devin Heroux get the low-down from Benny Heebz in the bubble, learn what ‘feed the horses’ means and gets a lesson in sass from Newfoundland and Labrador’s Greg Smith. 55:36

Four-time Brier champ Koe faces both Epping and Dunstone on Wednesday.

Ontario won its fourth straight downing Greg Smith of Newfoundland and Labrador 9-4.

“That was probably one of our best performance so far,” Epping said.” We just keep building momentum every game, getting sharper and sharper. If you would have said we’re four and one when we came into this after five games, I think we’d take that.”

After back-to-back losses, defending champion Brad Gushue returned to the win column with an 8-6 victory over Nova Scotia to get to 3-2.

The top four teams in each pool advance to the championship round starting Friday and take their pool records with them.

The championship round’s top three make playoffs. The No. 1 seed gets a bye to Sunday’s evening’s final and faces the victor of the afternoon semifinal.

Winner of three of the last four Canadian titles, Gushue’s schedule in Pool B was front-end loaded with contenders.

THAT CURLING SHOW | Greg Smith’s response to being underestimated:

“People underestimate you and then they lose to you,” says the Newfoundland and Labrador skip who is sometimes underestimated in sport because he’s queer. 0:59

Gushue’s Newfoundland rink lost tough battles to both Koe and Dunstone, but defeated Epping in its opener.

“I think the fact that we’ve got two losses this early put us a little further back in the pack,” Gushue said.

“The good thing for us is they came against two very good teams that are probably going to be around at the end of the week.

“As long as we can get through the rest of pool play and come in with a 6-2 record, then we grind it out on Friday and Saturday and see how things shake out.

“I think three losses at this point with the amount of upsets that have happened is still going to be in play. We’ve got a little bit of cushion, but I think we’ve used enough cushion at this point.”

WATCH | Manitoba’s Gunnlaugson claims 5th straight win at Brier:

Manitoba’s Jason Gunnlaugson defeats New Brunswick’s James Grattan 8-4 in Draw 12 of the Brier. 0:45

Nova Scotia, skipped by Scott McDonald, dropped to 3-3 alongside Quebec’s Michael Fournier.

Prince Edward Island’s Eddie McKenzie earned his first win downing Nunavut’s Peter Mackey 7-4.

P.E.I. was 1-4, Newfoundland’s Smith 1-5 and Nunavut was winless.

Manitoba’s Jason Gunnlaugson ranked first in Pool A at 5-0 following an 8-4 win at night against New Brunswick’s James Grattan (4-2).

Glenn Howard’s Wild Card Three was 4-1, Northern Ontario’s Brad Jacobs sat 4-2, and Alberta’s Brendan Bottcher was at 3-2.

Wild Card One’s Mike McEwen was 2-3 ahead of B.C.’s Steve Laycock (1-4) and Gregory Skauge of Northwest Territories (1-4). Yukon’s Dustin Mikkelson (0-6) remained winless.

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CBC | Sports News

B.C. gets 1 million calls within 1st hour of opening phone lines to vaccine appointments for elderly

Call centres in British Columbia received a million calls in the first hour after they opened to receive COVID-19 vaccine appointments for some of the province’s oldest residents, according to the doctor in charge of the province’s rollout plan.

Dr. Penny Ballem, who is also chair of Vancouver Coastal Health, spoke on CBC’s The Early Edition just after 8 a.m. Monday morning and said while call agents were hit with a “massive onslaught” the minute the lines opened, it was not unexpected and should not worry eligible residents who have not yet secured an appointment.

“Everyone’s going to get their vaccine,” said Ballem, adding it’s a big job, but the province is prepared.

The call centres opened at 7 a.m. at the Fraser, Island, Interior, Northern and Vancouver Coastal health authorities to allow appointments for people 90 years and older and Indigenous people who are 65 and older or identify as elders.

In less than three hours after they opened, 1.7 million calls came in.

Karen Bloemink, vice-president of pandemic response with Interior Health, asks people not to phone the call centre ahead of their eligibility dates that are based on their birth years.

“Call volumes will be closely monitored and if there are some delays initially, we will be working in the background to adjust and respond quickly,” she said. “Once an individual becomes eligible to receive their vaccine, they can book their appointment at any time.”

Plenty of spots remain

Health Minister Adrian Dix says there are about 47,000 people in the province who are 90 and older and 35,000 who are Indigenous people over 65, so he urged anyone who is not calling on behalf of someone in those categories to hang up the phone.

“I very much appreciate the enthusiasm of everybody calling in. But I would ask that people allow those who are eligible this week to book appointments,” he said. “That is a massive number of phone calls. If that were to continue, obviously no phone system would respond to that.”

Dix says health authorities are booking thousands of appointments and plenty of time slots remain.

There are still five days left to book for people in those age groups, so if callers don’t get through today, he says there is still time.

“This is not first-come, first-serve,” said Dix. “There are going to be lots of opportunities.”


Dix says the phone lines are the focus right now because of the age of those who are eligible.

Fraser Health was the only authority to launch an online booking system on the first day. Web-based platforms across health regions will become a larger component of booking as younger age categories get their turn, Dix said.

Dix says the “enormous” response on Monday reflects the significant support for vaccination in the province. 

Caller frustration

Some residents calling on behalf of their elderly parents spent all morning trying to get through on the phone lines.

Elaine Husdon, whose father is 95, said she called the Fraser Health number when the line opened at 7 a.m., “exactly on the dot,” and received a busy signal.

She said she has been redialing constantly and can’t even get on hold — she either gets a busy signal or a recording that says there is a high call volume that instructs her to hang up and try again.


A nurse takes a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination dose at Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver, B.C. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

Husdon said her father lives with her family and she decided to take a leave of absence from her job at a school because of the risk of contracting the virus and bringing it home to him.

Julie Tapley, whose 90-year-old father lives in the Vancouver Coastal Health region, also said she only received a busy signal every time she has called.

She said she spent two hours between 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. constantly pressing redial.

Tapley said she wishes that the health authority had set up an online booking system from the beginning, as Fraser Health did.

“I feel a bit frustrated because I know it’s very important to my dad to get (the vaccine),” she said, adding her parents have had a lonely year during the pandemic.

“I just want to get in the queue and start the process so that they can return to their normal lives,” said Tapley.


Who is eligible now

Seniors are being asked to phone during the following weeks, based on their age:

  • For the week of March 8: seniors born in 1931 or earlier (aged 90 and above) or Indigenous seniors born in 1956 or earlier (aged 65 and above).
  • For the week of March 15: seniors born in 1936 or earlier (aged 85 and above).
  • For the week of March 22: seniors born in 1941 or earlier (aged 80 and above).

Once someone becomes eligible, they are able to book at any time — meaning no one will miss their window for booking an appointment. 

The first appointments will be available on March 15. 

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CBC | Health News

Disneyland gets green light to reopen as California eases COVID-19 restrictions

California health officials set new rules on Friday that would allow Disneyland and other theme parks, stadiums and outdoor entertainment venues to reopen as early as April 1, after a closure of nearly a year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

But the return of Mickey Mouse to the “Happiest Place on Earth” and live spectators to the California ball parks of America’s favourite pastime still come with major caveats.

Theme and amusement parks would be permitted to restart on April 1 with severely limited capacity, but only if the counties where they operate are removed from the “purple” tier of California’s colour-coded COVID-19 restrictions, the system’s most stringent classification.

Masks and other safety measures would still be required, and initially the parks would be open only to state residents. Attendance would range from 15 to 35 per cent of normal capacity.

Outdoor stadiums, ball parks and performance arenas would also be allowed to welcome back live audiences starting April 1, though at a fraction of maximum seating and subject to the same tiered system of constraints.


Motorists line up at a COVID-19 vaccination site at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles on Feb. 23. Dodger Stadium and a Disneyland parking lot are currently being used as mass-vaccination sites. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/The Associated Press)

Opening day turnouts for Major League Baseball games would be muted affairs in Southern California, with no more than 100 spectators allowed in venues located in purple-zoned counties.

That would include the stadiums of the Los Angeles Dodgers, the San Diego Padres and the Anaheim Angels. San Francisco and Oakland, home of the Giants and the Athletics, respectively, are currently designated red, which would limit seating to 20 per cent capacity.

Easing rules

The changes in California, a leading U.S. epicentre of the pandemic during a year-end holiday surge of cases that strained health-care systems to the breaking point, come as the rate of infections across the country has slowed and vaccinations are on the rise.

But state health officials have charted a cautious reopening approach even as Gov. Gavin Newsom has come under mounting political pressure, including the threat of a recall election, to relax restrictions on the state’s social and economic life.

Walt Disney Co.’s Anaheim-based Disneyland lies in the heart of Orange County, which — like neighbouring Los Angeles and San Diego counties — has remained purple for months, a designation reflecting the prevalence of COVID-19 cases and dangerously high infection rates.

Newsom announced on Thursday a “modest loosening” of tier definitions by factoring in the increasing vaccinations within vulnerable communities.


California Gov. Gavin Newsom puts on a face mask in San Luis Obispo, Calif., on Tuesday. He has come under mounting political pressure, including the threat of a recall election, to relax restrictions on the state’s social and economic life. (David Middlecamp/The Tribune of San Luis Obispo via The Associated Press)

This would allow counties designated purple, for example, to progress more quickly to the red tier, where amusement and theme parks were previously ordered closed.

Friday’s announcement means theme parks in red-zoned counties could reopen at 15 per cent capacity on April 1. The less restrictive orange and yellow tiers would allow reopenings at 25 per cent and 35 per cent capacity, respectively.

Ken Potrock, president of the Disneyland Resort, said in a statement that the decision means “getting thousands of people back to work and greatly helping neighbouring businesses and our entire community.”

But it remained unclear whether rising vaccinations and falling COVID infection rates would go far enough for Anaheim to reach red by the first of next month. And Potrock did not give a date for a Disneyland reopening.

California-based baseball teams issued similar statements welcoming Friday’s announcement and the hope that conditions will allow limited numbers of fans back in stadiums next month.


Disney in September said it was furloughing some 28,000 workers, mostly across its U.S. theme parks in California and Florida. Walt Disney World in Florida reopened last July with limited capacity.

Dodger Stadium and a Disneyland parking lot are currently being used as mass-vaccination sites.

Theme parks such as Disneyland, Universal Studios, Legoland and Knott’s Berry Farm protested strongly last October when California health officials ruled out any quick reopening of their attractions.

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CBC | World News

AstraZeneca doses set to arrive tomorrow — but questions remain about who gets them first

The first batch of Canada’s supply of the AstraZeneca-Oxford vaccine is set to arrive tomorrow — but public health officials still have some distribution issues to sort out before they can deliver those shots.

Health Canada approved the AstraZeneca product last Friday. The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI), the independent panel that sets the guidelines for vaccine deployment, is not recommending that these shots be used in people aged 65 and over.

While Health Canada has determined the product is safe to use on all adults, NACI said there isn’t enough clinical trial data available to determine how effective this product is in preventing COVID-19 infection among people in this older cohort.

Health officials will be under pressure to quickly establish priorities for distribution of the AstraZeneca shots because 300,000 of the 500,000 doses set to arrive this week from the Serum Institute of India will expire in just a month’s time.

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, said NACI is prepared to update its guidance “as they see more and more real world data accumulating,” but for now the AstraZeneca product should be directed at younger Canadians.

“Don’t read their recommendations as sort of static. But this is what they’ve recommended at this point,” Tam said. “Just watch this space.”

It’s up to the provinces and territories to decide how to put these AstraZeneca shots to use. Some scheduling adjustments will be required because most jurisdictions are focused on vaccinating the elderly at this early stage of the immunization campaign.

Tam said some of the groups that were “potentially prioritized a little bit later on” will have a chance to get their shots earlier than planned because of the NACI guidance.

Most provinces have said that — after the elderly, front line health care workers and Indigenous adults are vaccinated — essential workers and people who face a greater risk of illness should be next in line for the second phase of shots.

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, the military commander leading the federal government’s vaccine logistics, said the shots will be “expedited as quickly as possible” to prevent wastage.

WATCH: Procurement Minister Anita Anand says AstraZeneca shots will arrive Wednesday

Procurement Minister Anita Anand says the first shipment of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine is scheduled to arrive in Canada on March 3. 1:06

Asked why Canada purchased vaccines that are set to expire during the first week of April, Procurement Minister Anita Anand said the federal government was responding to demands from the provinces to acquire more shots.

“They have repeatedly told the federal government that they want vaccines as soon as possible and that they’re ready to administer vaccines,” she said.

Beyond the question of who will get these shots, there’s a debate over just how long people should wait between the first and second doses.

NACI has recommended that provinces and territories follow the guidelines set by the manufacturers and approved by Health Canada regulators: 21 days between shots for the Pfizer product, 28 days for Moderna and between four and 12 weeks for the AstraZeneca doses.

Some provinces, notably Quebec, have ignored these guidelines from the beginning, preferring instead to administer as many first doses as possible to tamp down infection risk.

NACI ‘considering evidence’ on dosing intervals

Dr. Bonnie Henry, B.C.’s provincial health officer, announced Monday that the province would be extending the interval between doses for all three products to 16 weeks.

Tam said NACI is now “considering evidence” from the latest scientific studies about the intervals between shots and will provide an updated recommendation sometime this week.

Christine Elliott, Ontario’s health minister, said that while public health officials in her province have complied with NACI guidelines, they would shift gears to deploy first doses to more people if vaccine experts give them the green light to delay those second doses.

“We are anxiously awaiting NACI’s review of this to determine what they have to say and their recommendations,” Elliott said. “We want to make sure that the decisions that Ontario makes are based on science.”

Tam said data from B.C. and Quebec suggest there may be good reasons to wait longer.

“They’re vaccinating seniors in long-term care facilities and so on and we’re seeing quite a high level of protection. It also seems that the protection is obviously lasting even after the first dose,” she said.

In a recent analysis paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Danuta Skowronski of the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control and Dr. Gaston De Serres from the Institut national de sante publique du Quebec suggested that a single shot of the Pfizer vaccine might be almost as good as two.

The doctors found that, by waiting two weeks after vaccination to start measuring the rate of new infections, researchers recorded 92 per cent fewer COVID-19 cases among those who had received a single dose of the vaccine compared to those who got a placebo.

“With such a highly protective first dose, the benefits derived from a scarce supply of vaccine could be maximized by deferring second doses until all priority group members are offered at least one dose,” the doctors wrote in their paper.

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CBC | Health News

Prince Harry gets fresh about leaving royal duties, living in California

Prince Harry said he didn’t walk away from his royal duties, in an appearance on The Late, Late Show with James Corden that aired early Friday.

Harry and his wife, Meghan Markle, stepped away from full-time royal life in early 2020. Buckingham Palace confirmed last Friday they will not be returning to royal duties, and Harry will give up his honorary military titles.

Harry told Corden he decided to step away from his work as a front-line member of the royal family to protect his wife and son, as well as his own mental health.

“It was stepping back rather than stepping down,” he said. “It was a really difficult environment, which I think a lot of people saw, so I did what any father or husband would do and thought, how do I get my family out of here? But we never walked away, and as far as I’m concerned, whatever decisions are made on that side, I will never walk away.”

Harry and Meghan moved from England to California last year.


Britain’s Prince Harry, seen with wife Meghan Markle, was interviewed by Late, Late Show host James Corden. (Matt Dunham/The Associated Press)

The appearance on Corden’s show marked Harry’s first interview since his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, stripped the prince and his wife of their remaining royal duties. Corden’s segment trumped Oprah Winfrey, whose interview with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex is scheduled to air March 7.

During the segment, Harry and Corden tour southern California in an open-top bus, at one point arriving outside the mansion where the 1990s sitcom The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air was filmed.

“If it was good enough for the Fresh Prince, it’s good enough for a real prince,” Corden said.

The two then proceed to sing the show’s iconic theme song.

Views on The Crown

At one point, Corden asks Harry what he thinks of the Netflix series The Crown, which delves into the personal lives and public actions of the Royal Family. At times, the show has been criticized for its depictions of real people.

“Of course it’s not strictly accurate,” Harry said, “but loosely … it gives you a rough idea about what that lifestyle, what the pressures of putting duty and service above family and everyone else, what can come from that.”

But he noted, “I’m way more comfortable with The Crown than I am seeing the [media] stories written about my family or my wife or myself.”

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Joe Biden gets COVID-19 vaccine, urges Americans to get it as soon as it’s available

U.S. president-elect Joe Biden received his first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine live on television Monday at a hospital in Newark, Del., in an effort to boost confidence in its safety ahead of its wide distribution in the new year.

Biden has said he would make the fight against COVID-19, which has killed more than 315,000 Americans and infected more than 17.5 million, his top priority when he takes office on Jan. 20. At age 78, he is in the high-risk group for the highly contagious respiratory disease.

His black long-sleeved shirt rolled up, Biden received the injection from Tabe Masa, nurse practitioner and head of employee health services at Christiana Hospital in Newark, Del., in front of reporters.

After getting the shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, Biden praised medical professionals as “heroes.”

“I’m doing this to demonstrate that people should be prepared when it’s available to take the vaccine. There’s nothing to worry about,” Biden said.

His wife, Jill Biden, who got the injection earlier in the day, stood by.

WATCH | Biden gets the shot and tells Americans they should do the same: 

U.S. president-elect Joe Biden says he got the shot to demonstrate that people should take the vaccine themselves when it is available. “There’s nothing to worry about,” he said. 3:34

But Biden also noted that the vaccine would take time to roll out and that people should listen to medical experts and avoid travelling during the holidays.

Vice-president-elect Kamala Harris is expected to get the vaccine next week.

Republican President Donald Trump has frequently played down the severity of the pandemic and overseen a response many health experts say was disorganized, cavalier and sometimes ignored the science behind disease transmission.

Efforts to limit the economic fallout on Americans from the pandemic were boosted on Sunday when congressional leaders agreed on a $ 900-billion US package to provide the first new aid to citizens in months, with votes likely on Monday.

Biden names more economic officials

Biden on Monday named additional members to his National Economic Council, rounding out his economic policy-making team with people his transition office said would help lift Americans out of the economic crisis.

David Kamin, an official in former president Barack Obama’s White House, will be NEC deputy director, and Bharat Ramamurti, a former top economic adviser to Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s 2020 presidential campaign, will serve as NEC deputy director for financial reform and consumer protection, Biden’s team said in a statement.

Joelle Gamble will be special assistant to the president for economic policy.

“This is no time to build back the way things were before, this is the moment to build a new American economy that works for all,” Biden said in the statement.

Biden had already named Brian Deese, who helped lead Obama’s efforts to bail out the automotive industry after the 2008 financial crisis and negotiate the Paris climate agreement, to lead the council, which co-ordinates the country’s economic policy-making.

Much of the fate of Biden’s White House agenda will hinge on the outcome of a pair of Senate runoff elections in Georgia on Jan. 5 that will determine which party controls the upper chamber of the U.S. Congress.

Harris travelled on Monday to Columbus, Ga., to campaign on behalf of Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock, the Democratic candidates locked in tight races with incumbent Republicans.


U.S. President Donald Trump was briefly hospitalized with COVID-19 in October. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Trump was briefly hospitalized in October with COVID-19, and many of his advisers and White House staff have also contracted the illness.

The outgoing president, making unsubstantiated claims of widespread electoral fraud, has focused on trying to overturn his election loss in recent weeks, even as daily COVID-19 deaths soared. His campaign’s latest long-shot effort was another petition to the U.S. Supreme Court on Sunday that legal experts predict will fail.

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Eli Lilly’s COVID-19 antibody drug gets interim authorization in Canada

Canada has granted interim authorization to Eli Lilly’s antibody drug for treating COVID-19 in patients who are not hospitalized but are at risk of serious illness because of their age or other conditions, the drug-maker said on Friday.

The news comes weeks after the treatment, bamlanivimab, was given U.S. emergency use authorization by the Food and Drug Administration for helping newly diagnosed, high-risk patients avoid hospitalization.

Bamlanivimab was developed in partnership with Canadian biotech company AbCellera.

The Health Canada authorization was based on a clinical study in patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19, where patients treated with bamlanivimab showed reduced viral load and rates of symptoms and hospitalization.

The drug is a monoclonal antibody — a widely used class of biotech drugs — which in this case is a manufactured copy of an antibody the human body creates to fight infections.

“This authorization in Canada furthers our goal of making bamlanivimab available to patients who need it around the world and is evidence of the strong collaboration between industry and governments to get COVID-19 medicines to people as quickly as possible,” David A. Ricks, Lilly’s chair and CEO, said in a statement issued Friday.

WATCH | How well will COVID-19 vaccines work in the real world?

Infectious disease specialists answer questions about COVID-19 vaccines including if results from clinical trials will hold up in the real world. 6:49

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CBC | Health News

Space Mining Gets 400 Percent Boost From Bacteria, ISS Experiments Show

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If the next few decades go well, humans could find themselves living and working away from Earth on the moon or Mars. We’ll need lots of raw materials to sustain human endeavors on other planets, and a new project on the International Space Station (ISS) demonstrates how we can make space mining over 400 percent more efficient. All you need is a bacterial care package from home. 

Everything we send into orbit comes with a cost, and the numbers are not small. The cheapest option currently available, the SpaceX Falcon Heavy, clocks in at $ 1,500 per kilogram of payload. And this is a discounted bulk rate. If you’re looking to send something smaller into space, the Falcon 9 costs about $ 2,700 per kilogram. Naturally, this makes collecting resources in space an appealing option, a process called in-situ resource utilization. 

On Earth, bacteria are responsible for freeing up minerals like iron and magnesium trapped in rocks, making them easier to extract. Some mining operations have also turned to bacteria as a way to reduce the usage of toxic chemicals, a process called biomining. The lack of such bacteria in space could make an already risky mining operation even more difficult, but a team from the University of Edinburgh spent the last ten years developing a technology that shows how we might harness bacteria to do the same job on the moon or Mars. 

The team created small matchbook-sized devices called biomining reactors, and 18 of them were sent up to the ISS in July 2019 for testing in low-gravity environments. The goal was to determine if bacteria will have the same rock weathering effects on the moon or Mars. The reactors contained a solution rich in one of several bacterial species, or with no bacteria at all as a control. Along with the bacteria, each reactor had a piece of volcanic basalt, a type of rock that is common on the moon and contains minerals that can be freed up by bacteria. 

According to the study in Nature Communications, the ISS crew did not note any significant difference in the rock-weathering function of bacteria with simulated Mars gravity, simulated Earth gravity, or the microgravity of the station. While two of the three bacteria didn’t have much effect on weathering, testing on a bacteria called Sphingomonas desiccabilis showed a massive boost. These organisms were able to increase mineral availability in the reactor between 111.9 and 429.2 percent compared with the controls. 

The researchers also noted that bacterial concentrations reached the same levels in all tested gravity conditions, probably because they had plenty of nutrients. That means biomining in space is feasible, provided you can keep your bacterial helpers well-fed. It’s not currently economically viable to send mined materials back to Earth, but biomining could help sustain a long-term human presence in space.

Now read:

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Donald Trump gets no political obituary. He, and his legacy, aren’t done

On that fateful day in June 2015 that he rode down a gilded escalator into the world of electoral politics, Donald Trump’s critics saw a pastel-faced buffoon destined to melt away after an attention-seeking stint in the political sun.

How wrong they were. 

Trump will never truly go away. A closer-than-expected election makes it only that much clearer that defeat is but a prelude to Trump’s next act as a permanent fixture on the American political scene. 

It’s not just that his thirst for the stage has allies predicting that he’ll run again in 2024, and that in the meantime, he’ll keep doing rallies and act as the leader of the opposition.

It’s that Trump has already left an indelible mark on the nation he leads, revealing several truths about it in the process.

WATCH | Americans cheer and denounce Biden victory: 

Voters gathered in cities across the United States to celebrate and decry the election of Joe Biden as president. 4:43

The elements of Trumpism

There have been countless newspaper columns, books and academic studies asking what drove Trumpism: Was it economics? Was it racism? A new nationalism? Nostalgia? The joy of an unpredictable carnival?

It was all of the above.

If several years of talking to his supporters has illustrated anything, it’s that human beings can hold multiple overlapping feelings at once.

Take Chip Paquette, for instance.


In the five years since he rolled down the escalator at Trump Tower on June 16, 2015, to announce his presidential bid, Trump transformed U.S. politics. (Brendan McDermid/Reuters)

Early on in the Trump phenomenon, at a 2016 primary rally in New Hampshire, the retired police officer chuckled at the candidate’s antics, elbowing his seat neighbour as if at a comedy show. He howled with laughter when Trump referred to Sen. Ted Cruz as a “pussy.”

In a conversation with a reporter later, he said he missed the good old days — back when a cop could punch a suspect, without controversy.

He questioned the wisdom of free trade and expressed a desire for more tariffs on imports: “We’re losing jobs,” he said.

Then, finally, he casually brought up something else he liked about Trump: “I like the idea of him banning the Muslims.”

The Trump campaign’s proposed Muslim ban evolved after he took office, becoming a travel ban on mostly Muslim countries. It underwent other iterations, amid legal disputes, and triggered protests from people disgusted that this campaign promise ever saw the light of day in a country with religious freedom stamped into its founding DNA. 

Trump smashed enough norms that he’ll be studied by future generations in political-science departments around the world.


Trump drew massive crowds to rallies. And he kept doing it during a pandemic, as here on Oct. 31 in Butler, Penn. (Carlos Barria/Reuters)

He also revealed things about the modern-day U.S. — and some of those lessons hold implications far beyond American territory, touching every nation.

The first is that the U.S. will be a less-predictable partner. 

Trump’s policy legacy stretches far beyond U.S.

There’s no guarantee agreements with one U.S. administration will survive a change in government. That unpredictability stretches beyond Trump to past examples such as Bill Clinton’s signing of the Kyoto climate accord and George W. Bush shunning it.

Trump announced in the middle of a global pandemic that the U.S. would leave the World Health Organization, stalled the World Trade Organization, questioned the point of NATO, abandoned the Iran nuclear deal and reversed a diplomatic thaw with Cuba.

“This egg can’t be unscrambled,” wrote Trump critic and Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman last month in a New York Times column titled “Trump Killed the Pax Americana.”

“No matter how good a global citizen America becomes in the next few years, everyone will remember that we’re a country that elected someone like Donald Trump, and could do it again.”


Trump’s tougher attitude to international issues caused tensions with allies but also led to the renegotiation of NAFTA in 2018. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)

Trump turned the page on a chapter of American history written after the Second World War, in which a young superpower helped build new global institutions in the hope of creating a long-lasting peace.

It’s unclear what the postscript to the postwar era would look like.

Trump did shift attention to a new geopolitical challenge: China. His administration struck a more aggressive posture, and accused China of breaking its promises to the West.

There’s a huge audience for this message. 

Passionate devotion equals continuing power 

One Republican operative said whether or not he runs for president again, Trump’s policies on China, trade and immigration will have a lingering effect.

“We don’t know what Trump’s role in the party is going to be going forward, [and] is he going to be keeping open the option of perhaps running again in 2024,” said Matt Mackowiak, a party organizer and consultant.

“I do think he’s changed the party in significant ways.”

Trump’s message not only drew record turnout from working-class white Americans, but he also made inroads in his second race among groups that rarely vote Republican.

Trump performed better with Black men, Latino and Asian-American voters this year than he did four years ago.

To be clear, he still won only a small percentage of minority voters. But some were among his staunchest defenders.

Sylvia Menchaca, a Mexican restaurant owner near Phoenix, applauded Trump for putting his country first and wanting immigration limits.


Business owner Sylvia Menchaca, seen here working in her Arizona restaurant, is a huge Trump fan. And she thinks the polls will soon look foolish — again. (CBC News)

She told CBC News she felt sorry for migrant children separated from parents at the border, but, she said, the country needed to get immigration under control. 

“I love him,” said Menchaca, who described herself as a religious woman. “Trump is similar to one of the kings in the Bible. Nobody in the Bible is perfect.… But some of them were blessed by God to run a country.”

Nothing would ever rattle her support for him, she said.

WATCH | Trump supporters in Arizona react to Biden win:

In spite of widespread projections for a Joe Biden win, Donald Trump supporters at a pre-planned gathering site in Phoenix, Ariz., Saturday insisted Biden is not the next president and repeated Trump’s unproven allegations of voter fraud. 2:12

Trump sounded real — even when he was lying

One reason Trump engendered uncommon devotion was he didn’t sound like a politician — he sounded real while other politicians relied on scripts and talking points.

Yet his telling-it-like-it-is effect was chronically undermined by one uncomfortable truth: He lied. He lied a lot.

This is different from most politicians who will often exaggerate, and frequently obfuscate, while generally avoiding flat-out lies.

Trump operated on another level. 

When it came to spouting untruths, he pivoted from one to another with the same painless strokes reminiscent of his supporter, Bobby Orr, gliding across a hockey rink.


President Donald Trump walks away after speaking at the White House, Thursday, Nov. 5. (Evan Vucci/Associated Press)

Half the country fumed; the other half brushed it off.

He left Americans split on an uncommon range of issues: COVID-19 mask-wearing; Black Lives Matter; voting by mail. They all became litmus tests of political loyalty. 

You were with him or against him, right down to the end, when the polarizing question became whether or not you would support his attack on the accuracy of a U.S. election.

WATCH | Voters with opposing views of Donald Trump converge on Atlanta after 2020 election is called:

Pro-Trump and anti-Trump protesters are gathering and, at times, jeering each other on an Atlanta street in the open-carry state amid projections for a Joe Biden presidency from major networks. 5:41

The polarizer-in-chief

These constant battles divided families, and it’s no exaggeration to say he even had a polarizing effect on mating rituals. Trump fans, and people abhorred by Trump fans, split off into separate dating sites, with names such as Donald Daters and Trump Singles.

One Florida widow said people just simply want to know, before investing time in someone, whether their values are compatible, and she sees Trump support as a test of values.

She was no fan. She said Trump has stoked the country’s divisions and made people angrier, and she didn’t vote for him despite being a Republican.

“Politics used to be a part of your life, but it didn’t consume your life,” said Arlene Macellaro. “But now it seems like the thing to do in my Republican Party is to be angry.”

People in her Florida retirement community tell stories you often hear in the U.S. these days — of old friendships suspended over differences on Trump.

WATCH | Florida voter Arlene Macellaro reflects on how Trump changed Americans’ engagement with politics:

Arlene Macellaro lives in a staunchly Republican retirement city in Florida called The Villages, but says she won’t be voting for Donald Trump this election. 0:31

One final and perhaps most fundamental truth the Trump era exposed is that democracy may be more fragile than assumed  — that the rules protecting it may exist primarily on paper but are, in the end, enforced by a civic spirit.

In a bitterly polarized era pitting the blue team versus the red team, old norms were occasionally discarded.

Trump called elections stolen, called for opponents’ arrest, pardoned friends, used federal regulators to punish unfriendly media and ignored the constitutional rules for how to appoint cabinet members. 

WATCH | Trump accuses Democrats of trying to ‘steal the election’:

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said Thursday that Democrats could ‘try to steal the election from us’ if ‘illegal votes’ cast after election day were counted. There is no evidence that ballots were cast after Nov. 3. 0:40

Ask a foreign government to investigate Joe Biden? It’s what got him impeached. And there were no real-time consequences. 

He lost precisely one Republican in the impeachment vote: Mitt Romney, and for that act of alleged betrayal, the former Republican presidential nominee was quickly shunned by party grassroots members.

Trump became the first impeached president to lead his party into another election.

WATCH | Did Trump deliver on his 2016 promises?:

From boosting manufacturing in the United States to building a border wall, Donald Trump made a lot of promises during his first presidential campaign. CBC News’s Paul Hunter checks in on whether he delivered on them. 6:00

He talks, Republicans follow

And had a few votes broken the other way in a few swing states, had he gotten better control over the coronavirus pandemic, he might have won.

Instead, he’ll be gone from the White House in 11 weeks. It’s unclear he’ll ever concede he lost, or ever follow the tradition of extending grace to his successor.

His niece, a psychologist, author and now a critic of him, wrote a book suggesting he has a pathologically delicate ego and lives in terror of not being admired.

He enjoyed the granite-hard support of the conservative base. 

It was illustrated by what happened last week when his son, Don Jr., issued a warning to Republicans: if they had any future aspirations to lead the party, they had better start fighting the election result.

A virtual stampede ensued. 

Possible members of the 2024 field, Nikki Haley, Tom Cotton, Josh Hawley, Ted Cruz and others started complaining about the process. 


Sen. Lindsey Graham went on Fox News and promised to donate $ 500,000 US to the president’s legal fund for fighting the result.

No matter what the president does next, he’ll remain a kingmaker in the Republican Party, and those party members will keep courting his support.

If, however, he chooses to run again in a primary four years from now, he’d probably beat them — barring some unforeseen twist, such as legal troubles in New York, his former home state.

So there are no political obituaries this weekend, not even for an election loser. Because you can’t eulogize what’s not dead.

WATCH | ‘Let’s give each other a chance,’ Biden tells Trump supporters in victory speech:

President-elect Joe Biden spoke directly to Americans who didn’t vote for him during his victory address in Wilmington, Del., saying it’s ‘time to listen to each other again’ and to stop treating opponents like enemies. 1:42

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