Tag Archives: Jones’

Alberta’s Laura Walker beats Jennifer Jones, moves within 2 wins of Scotties title

Alberta’s Laura Walker advanced to the semifinal of the Canadian women’s curling championship with a 9-8 win over Manitoba’s Jennifer Jones in Sunday’s tiebreaker game in Calgary.

Walker faces defending champion Kerri Einarson in an afternoon semifinal with the winner taking on Ontario’s Rachel Homan for the championship in the evening.

  • Watch and engage with CBC Sports’ That Curling Show live every day of The Scotties at 7:30 p.m. ET on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube

Jones missed an attempted double takeout in the 10th end, which left Walker an open draw to score three for the win in the tiebreaker.

Manitoba and Alberta were tied for third at 9-3 after the championship round, which required a tiebreaker game to solve.

WATCH | Walker wins tiebreaker against 6-time Scotties champ:

Laura Walker and her team from Alberta eliminated Jennifer Jones of Manitoba 9-8 Sunday in the tiebreaker match at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts in Calgary. 0:52

Jones, a six-time champion at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts, was chasing a record seventh title.

Einarson’s foursome out of Manitoba’s Gimli Curling Club beat Quebec’s Laurie St-Georges 7-4 on Saturday before suffering a 10-9 loss to Jones in the evening draw.

“We’re definitely just focusing on ourselves and what we need to do,” Einarson said. “We’re in control of our own destiny.”

$ 100,000 to Scotties champion

Einarson is attempting to win the first back-to-back Hearts titles since Homan in 2013-14.

Sunday’s victor earns $ 100,000 in prize money and a return trip to the 2022 Tournament of Hearts in Thunder Bay, Ont., as Team Canada.

The runner-up earns $ 60,000 and $ 40,000 goes to the third-place team.

The winner doesn’t have a world championship, however, in which to wear the Maple Leaf.

The March 19-28 tournament in Schaffhausen, Switzerland was cancelled by the World Curling Federation because of the pandemic.

The 2020 world championship in Prince George, B.C., was called off for the same reason, so Einarson wasn’t able to represent Canada there.

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Jennifer Jones breaks career wins record at Scotties

Athletes setting significant records in their sport are often too busy achieving those milestones to process their place in history at the moment.

What helps Jennifer Jones wrap her head around a career 153 wins at the Canadian women’s curling championship is seeing them through the eyes of people she loves.

Jones became the career leader in wins at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts with a 6-5 win Tuesday over Newfoundland and Labrador’s Sarah Hill.

Jones arrived at the 2021 Tournament of Hearts two back of the 152 victories held by Colleen Jones.


Jennifer Jones knows the record would have meant a lot to her late father Larry, who died two years ago at age 80.

“My dad always loved the records,” Jones aid Monday. “He always followed all the records. I know he would watching from above, [be] very, very proud.

“It definitely means something to me. As you kind of approach the end of your career, just to be remembered for doing something that you love is pretty remarkable.”

The wins record is among many Jones holds in women’s curling.

If the six-time national champion prevails in Calgary, the 46-year-old from Winnipeg will be the only woman to win seven.

Should daughters Isabella and Skyla take up curling, the record book provides a compelling argument that their mother is the best to ever play the game.

“My kids do look at it. There’s a book with my name in it with some records,” Jones said.

“I hope if anything it just shows them that if you work hard, that dreams are possible. I just want them to have the best possible life and if this can have any impact on that, it’s absolutely incredible.”

WATCH | That Curling Show: Jones brought to tears by mother, daughters:

The Team Manitoba skip is surprised on screen by her mom Carol and daughters Skyla and Bella. 3:15

Jones’ first win in 2002 was an 8-4 victory over Prince Edward Island’s Kathy O’Rourke, who is P.E.I’s alternate in Calgary this year.

Jones’ 153rd wasn’t a work of art as her team’s shooting accuracy was 80 per cent, but it was one Jones and her Manitoba foursome needed to get to a 3-2 record.

Sitting on 2-3 until their next game Wednesday wouldn’t have felt uncomfortable.

“We were grinding it out today,” Jones said. “We really needed this win to stay kind of in there in the competition.”

Other results at the Scotties

Quebec’s Laurie St-Georges topped Pool B at 4-1 ahead of Prince Edward Island’s Suzanne Birt at 3-1. Manitoba was knotted at 3-2 with Chelsea Carey’s Wild Card One.

St-Georges downed Nunavut’s Lori Eddy 7-5. Carey lost a second straight game, falling 7-5 to B.C.’s Corryn Brown.

B.C., Newfoundland and Saskatchewan were even at 2-2. Saskatchewan’s Sherry Anderson fell 7-6 to New Brunswick’s Melissa Adams, who won her first game. Nunavut was winless in five games.

Ontario’s Rachel Homan and defending champion Kerri Einarson at 4-0 were the only undefeated teams in the tournament heading into Tuesday’s Pool A draw.

The top four teams from each pool of nine at the end of the preliminary round Thursday advance to the two-day championship round and take their records with them.

The championship round’s top three will be Sunday’s playoff teams, with the No. 1 seed rewarded with a bye to that day’s final.

‘A role model’

Jones has won everything there is to win in women’s curling, including two world titles a decade apart in 2008 and 2018.

Jones, third Kaitlyn Lawes, second Jill Officer and lead Dawn McEwen went undefeated en route to an Olympic gold medal in 2014.

“I can’t believe this is my 11th year with Jennifer and the girls,” Lawes said. “I still feel like I’m the 21-year-old kid when I joined the team.

“I was just so eager to learn from the best. I’ve always looked up to Jen. She’s a role model and how special is it to be able to play with people that you’re inspired by?”

Jones and former second Officer own the record for most Hearts final appearances (9). Dawn McEwen, who is pregnant and sitting out this year, played lead for Jones in seven of them.

Jones has appeared in the most playoff games (33) and shares the playoff win record (21) with Officer.

“I’ve been so fortunate to have the best human beings as teammates that have supported me throughout I don’t know how many years,” Jones said.

In her 16th Hearts appearance, Jones trails only Colleen Jones (19) for the most by a skip.

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Lisa Weagle in for Team Jones as Dawn McEwen says no to bubble due to pregnancy

With exactly a month to go until the start of the Scotties inside the curling bubble in Calgary, Team Jennifer Jones has firmed up its roster.

Longtime lead Dawn McEwen is pregnant and expecting in April, and will not enter the bubble. That means Lisa Weagle assumes the role for the entire event. 

“I’m really excited to have the chance to play. You never know when you’re going to get back to another Scotties again so it’s nice to have that clarity,” Weagle told CBC Sports. 

“Obviously we wish Dawn was there with us as our five-person team but she’s got a baby to prepare for and we’re really thrilled for her.”

When Team Jones made the announcement that Weagle would be joining them after being blind-sided by the news she had been let go from Team Rachel Homan last March, eyebrows were raised across the curling world about the decision — many wondered how they would determine who would play what games.

“We made that decision for a variety of reasons. Obviously illness or injury or pregnancy were a few of those reasons and it worked out perfectly,” Jones told CBC Sports.


Dawn McEwen, left, longtime lead for skip Jennifer Jones, right, is pregnant and won’t be part of the Calgary bubble. (Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press)

Manitoba stripes

After wearing the Ontario colours for years, Weagle is now ready to put on the Manitoba stripes and compete with what she calls a “powerhouse” curling team.

“I’m really excited. It’s been something to look forward to. And to be there with a new team. It feels like I’m a kid again. I have that sense of gratitude and the passion is back,” Weagle said.

“I’m just happy I was able to land on another world-class team. My family and friends have ordered a bunch of Manitoba hoodies and hats. They’re all in now.”

The team was able to play in a couple of events this past fall in Kitchener, Ont. Both Jones and Weagle say it was an immediate fit. 

“We’re really fortunate that Lisa is a world-class lead. It feels like we’ve been playing with her for a really long time,” Jones said.

Weagle says the team has spent countless hours on Zoom and FaceTime, planning and strategizing for the Scotties.

“We just have this amazing knowledge base we’re able to build on,” Weagle said. 

“We were laughing after our first meeting after our first game. It felt like I Had been part of the team for a really long time. Our communication has been great.”

Team Jones still has the opportunity to add a fifth player to its roster.

“We haven’t made that determination yet. The original plan when we put this team together was that we’d be a five-person team and we’re super happy for Dawn that she’s expecting,” said Jones. “The timing just doesn’t work for her right now and we’re totally supportive of that.”

WATCH | Heroux, Jones on the Calgary curling bubble:

Devin Heroux is joined by six-time Scotties medallist Colleen Jones to discuss the announcement of the Calgary curling bubble. 5:34

Scotties set for Feb. 19

The Scotties bubble is set to begin on Friday, Feb. 19 with the championship game scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 28 — Curling Canada has said the field will include 18 teams this year due to unprecedented times in the midst of a pandemic. 

“I’m beyond excited but also know that the world we live in these days, things can change any given second. We’re just taking it day-by-day,” Jones said. 

Jones has won six Scotties titles as a skip, tied for most-ever with Colleen Jones. 

Weagle has won the Scotties three times as a member of Team Homan.

But now a new chapter for these players is about to begin.

“It’s going to look a little different and feel a little different with the bubble and wearing a Manitoba jersey but I’m really excited for all of it,” Weagle said. 

“At the end of the day, we all have the same goal and that’s to represent Canada.”

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Edmonton Oilers defenceman Caleb Jones says he tested positive for COVID-19

Edmonton Oilers defenceman Caleb Jones has acknowledged he tested positive for COVID-19 before training camp.

Jones says he tested positive when he returned to Edmonton from his home in Dallas.

Jones opened his media session on Friday by revealing his positive test. He said he was asymptomatic.

The NHL is not releasing the names of players who test positive for COVID-19, and the league also is no longer revealing the teams in updates on positive tests.

Jones, 23, becomes the second NHL player to acknowledge a positive test in a media interview. Maple Leafs centre Auston Matthews also told reporters he tested positive on the first day of training camp on Monday, weeks after a report in The Toronto Sun on the star’s diagnosis.

Jones said he did his 14 days of isolation before camp started, but was held out of main sessions for the first three days as he tried to get himself back up to speed.

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Khari Jones received death threats as CFL player in Winnipeg

Khari Jones doesn’t have to look far for a reminder that racism exists in Canada.

The Montreal Alouettes head coach divulged during a teleconference Tuesday he received death threats while he was the quarterback of the CFL’s Winnipeg Blue Bombers because of his interracial marriage. Jones is black and his wife, Justine, is white.

An emotional Jones — speaking just over a week after a white policeman kneeled on the neck of a black man, resulting in a tragic death in Minneapolis — said the threats came in the form of letters that remain in his possession.

“It’s just a reminder you always have to be on alert a little bit,” Jones said. “It could’ve been one person but one is still too many and to do that on the basis of a person’s skin colour is horrible.

“Every once in a while, every blue moon I take a look at them. They never found the person who wrote the letters — he used a fake name — but he’s still out there, people like him are still out there. That was 20-something years ago and it’s still happening.”

WATCH | Eskimos lineman Justin Renfrow says he feels safer living in Canada:

After experiencing a violent incident of racial profiling in his home city of Philadelphia, Edmonton Eskimos offensive linesman Justin Renfrow made a decision to spend as much time in Canada as possible. 14:25

Jones, 49, played parts of five seasons with Winnipeg (2000-04). The soft-spoken and amiable Jones was named the CFL’s outstanding player in 2001 after leading the Bombers to a 14-4 regular-season record and Grey Cup appearance.

The five-foot-11, 195-pound Jones played for B.C., Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary and Hamilton from 1997-07. He rejoined the Bombers in October 2007 and retired as a member of the franchise. Jones began his CFL coaching career in 2009 as Hamilton’s quarterback coach.

Sadly, the threatening letters weren’t Jones’s first exposure to racism.

Wrongly arrested at gunpoint

In the early 1990s during Jones’s college days at UC Davis, Jones said himself, his brother, and some friends were wrongly arrested at gunpoint, forced to the ground and handcuffed by white policemen in Sacramento, Calif.

“It was a case of mistaken identity but we called it, at the time, being black while walking,” Jones said. “That’s just something that had happened with people you knew and it happened to me, four or five of my friends, my brother was there.

“It’s a horrible feeling to be pointed out for something like that.”

Jones’s eyes welled up discussing the tragic death last week of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who died in Minneapolis while in police custody. With Floyd handcuffed and lying face down, Derek Chauvin, a white policeman, kept his knee on Floyd’s neck for almost nine minutes, the final two minutes 53 seconds after Floyd became unresponsive.

Video of the incident was readily available on television and social media. After watching, Jones took to Twitter on Monday — a rarity for the Alouettes coach — to express his pain, anger and sadness over Floyd’s death.

“I can’t stop thinking about George Floyd,” Jones tweeted. “He is me.

“Breonna Taylor [a black woman fatally shot March 13 by Louisville police officers] is my daughter. I’m angry, hurt, and sad.”

WATCH | Canadian athletes speak out against racism:

Canadian athletes have been speaking out against racism and for change, including tennis youngster Felix Auger-Aliassime, basketball legend Steve Nash, and Olympians Kia Nurse, Karina LeBlanc and Perdita Felicien 2:38

Jones, entering his second season as Alouettes head coach, said he posted the tweet after talking with Montreal starting quarterback Vernon Adams Jr. Following the Floyd incident, Jones wrote his players about what he’d experienced in his life.

“That’s just what I felt when I saw the video,” Jones said. “The inhumanity of it was something that struck a chord in me, for sure, and I think in a lot of the world.

“I won’t watch it again. It’s in there now.”


Jones said he hasn’t spoken to his two teenage daughters about Floyd’s death. But he doesn’t feel he really has to.

“I just couldn’t stop crying [after watching the video] so they knew how it affected me and I think it affected them as well,” he said. “I’ve spoken to them a little bit over the years … fortunately we’ve moved quite a bit in Canada and for the most part, every place we’ve lived has treated my girls well and treated us well.

“I think fortunately for them they haven’t had to deal with [racism] on a first-hand basis all that much, if at all. I’ve often discussed with them what it can be like in the States, in certain places in particular, just to be aware and to be careful out there. “

But Jones said it is always a challenge.

“When you’re black, you know some things might happen to you,” he said. “I knew what to do and how to try to behave when I was stopped for a traffic ticket or something.

“There’s just a different way you have to respond to things when tensions are heightened. Canada is, believe me, much better and I feel much better about the social climate but there are still issues.”

CFL clubs, players speak out

Last weekend, the CFL and its nine teams all issued statements condemning racism. Saskatchewan Roughriders linebacker Solomon Eliminian, the president of the CFL Players’ Association, also outlined his experiences in a letter to union members.

Montreal running back James Wilder Jr. has been a vocal advocate as well. The former Florida State star has participated in peaceful protests in Houston, where he’s currently training, and been active denouncing racism on social media.

“I think James is a smart person, I’m going to talk with him,” Jones said. “I never want to push the players one way or the other.

“I think these are smart men, they see what I see and they have brains too. I want them to do what they feel is necessary and some things go beyond your job. I’m proud of the players for their responses. I want to go protest too, I want to be out there too. I understand his [Wilder’s] pain and frustration with everything.”

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Player’s Own Voice podcast: Jennifer Jones takes the 5th

According to her peers, teammates and adversaries, Jennifer Jones is the greatest female curler of all time. 

According to Anastasia Bucsis, host of Player’s Own Voice, ‘J- Jones’ is a strong contender for greatest podcast guest of all time — no matter what Ben Hebert might say in his own defence. 

The Manitoba skip recently negotiated the biggest free-agent transaction in curling history, bringing Lisa Weagle into her rink as a fifth. Curling fans were taken aback by the move: How much firepower can a team possibly have if Lisa Weagle is the fifth

Jones answers that question neatly on the podcast. The true value of the fifth is best revealed at the Olympics, so why wait to the last second to build the team that is going for gold on the biggest stage?

Jones also addresses her famous intensity, and helps us understand how being competitive can be compartmentalized. She insists that her focus on winning melts away when she’s off the ice. Fierce and friendly seems like an oxymoron, but Jones is living proof it can happen.

Like the CBC Sports’ Player’s Own Voice essay series, POV podcast lets athletes speak to Canadians about issues from a personal perspective. To listen to Jennifer Jones, or last week’s guests Christine Sinclair, subscribe for free on iTunes, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Tune In or wherever you get your other podcasts.

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Jennifer Jones recalls celebration of final curling event with her dad

Jennifer Jones says it was one of the most emotional moments of her illustrious curling career — a confluence of events seemingly fated to coincide with one another.

Jones’ rink had won the 2018 Scotties in dominant fashion, losing just two times all tournament. It was her sixth championship, tying Colleen Jones for the national record.

Accolades followed at the 2019 event in Calgary. A Jones victory vaulted her into second all-time on the Tournament of Hearts wins list. She currently sits at 200. 

Then, a TSN panel of broadcasters, reporters and top curlers voted the Winnipeg native the greatest Canadian women’s curler of all time. Jones remembers celebrating the moment with her parents at their AirBnB in Calgary.

It would be the last time Jones’ father, Larry, watched her curl in person.

“I remember coming back to where they were staying and he said to me, ‘you’re pretty good at curling, eh?'” Jones told CBC Sports’ Anastasia Bucsis on the Player’s Own Voice podcast on Tuesday. “‘Not bad, dad.’ And that’s one of the last memories I have with my dad, so I’ll always remember that day for the rest of my life.”

Larry Jones died May 21, 2019 at 80 years old. Jennifer says it was her father who first put her on the ice and taught her about curling.


“He’s the one who had this love of curling that was infectious in all my family and who, I think, he lived vicariously through me every time I played,” Jones said.

Jones, 45, also won Olympic gold at the 2014 Games in Sochi. She said she grew up a shy kid, but found solace on the ice.

“I loved the smell of the ice. I loved the feeling I had when I was out there. I felt like I was safe and I was at home and that’s why I played,” Jones said.

Thus, the Canadian women’s curling GOAT moniker carries with it a hint of irony.

“I started curling because I love to play and it was an outlet for me and then all of a sudden to be recognized as one of the greatest of all time, it’s crazy. It’s mind boggling to me,” Jones said.

Striving to be the best

For Jones, the moment and the title were too difficult to reconcile then. In fact, she says that may not ever happen.

Jones is married to fellow pro curler Brent Laing. The couple plays mixed doubles together. They have two kids – Isabella, 7, and Skyla, 3. It was Isabella who hammered home to her mother what that TSN poll truly meant.

Isabella heard the news, and asked in the simplest terms: “Mom, are you one of the best ever out of everybody?” Mom replied that yes, that’s what they voted on.

“Well I wanna be the best at something one day, mom,” Isabella responded.

WATCH | Jones wins record-tying 6th Scotties title:

Jones and Team Manitoba beat Team Wild Card in extra ends to win the 2018 Scotties Championship in Penticton, BC. 1:27

The elder Jones said that was all the perspective she needed.

“So I see how we can be role models and mentors for our kids and if in some small way that helps her achieve one of her dreams, then it’s almost like another dream come true for me,” Jones said.

For Larry Jones and Jennifer Jones and now Isabella Jones, curling is a family affair.

And so for Larry to be there for Jennifer to accept the title as the greatest Canadian women’s curler and for Isabella to acknowledge the true meaning of that bestowment, of course the Olympic gold medallist would be emotional.

“For [dad], it was just watching his daughter doing what she loved to do. And then when he reflected sometimes he’d shake his head and say ‘I can’t believe all that you’ve accomplished,'” Jones said.

“So I think for him it was just like any parent just seeing your kids happy and seeing their dreams come true.”

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U.S. Olympian Lolo Jones calls for IOC to postpone Tokyo Olympics

Lolo Jones is 37 — angling for a comeback to the track and well aware that she’s running out of time.

These days, though, earning a spot in the Tokyo Olympics is nowhere close to her No. 1 priority.

The hurdler-turned-bobsledder-turned celebrity, who remains one of the most recognizable and followed Olympic athletes in the United States, is imploring the IOC to send a different message from the one it has thus far about the coronavirus crisis. It has yet to postpone the games, set to start July 24, and by not doing that, Jones believes it is subtly — or not so subtly — telling athletes that they need to be ready, just in case.

“It’s tearing athletes apart,” Jones said Saturday in an interview with The Associated Press. “We want to be like everyone else. We want to be healthy, responsible citizens. But we’re also afraid the IOC is going to say, in a month, that the games are on, and, what, hopefully you’re going to still be in shape?”

Some could be. Even more probably won’t. Such is the state of sports across the globe, where different restrictions exist in virtually every country, and in every state in the U.S. Jones has access to a track near her home in Louisiana, but has been heeding the warnings of health officials and government, opting to shut things down.

“I fear contaminating my coach,” Jones said. “And I fear that we’re not doing our due diligence, as athletes, to send the message: We need to be sticking in our house, self-quarantining. We’ve got bigger things to worry about right now” than training.

Before shifting her focus to bobsled, which allowed her to become one of the rare athletes to compete in both the Summer and Winter Games, Jones was a breakout star in the buildup to the Beijing Olympics in 2008. She caught her shoe on the second-to-last hurdle in the 100-meter finals and finished seventh — and in shock — in a race won by teammate Dawn Harper.

Four years later, Jones came into Olympic trials out of the top three in the rankings, not expected to make the team. She finished third at trials and made it back to the games.

It’s those lessons — there’s a reason they run the races — that also feeds into her desire to see Tokyo postponed. With each day that passes, there’s an increasingly minute chance of a fair Olympic trials. USA Track and Field has long prided itself on taking the top three finishers in each event to the Olympics, regardless of their world ranking or past results.

“In 2012, I was losing every race and went to Olympic trials with one of the slowest times and ended up making the team,” she said. “In 2008, I was winning every race and went to the Olympics and lost the gold medal to someone who got third at trials. There are too many talented athletes to do it politically, or to pick teams based on last year. You cannot do it.”

She took heart in the letter USATF sent to the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee on Friday, pressing for a delay.

“Our goal remains to achieve athletic excellence during the Olympic Games, but not at the expense of the safety and well-being of our athletes,” CEO Max Siegel wrote in the letter.

Which is Jones’ point, too.

She said she understands why the outcry from athletes, though growing, isn’t as huge as it could be. There are thousands of athletes across the globe who see this as their first, or last, or best, chance at Olympic glory — and who want to be given every opportunity to compete.

But Jones thinks it’s best to wait until 2021, or 2022, or whenever it’s safe again. And if she’s willing to wait at age 37, maybe others will be, too.

“It’s hard, because obviously, these are dreams we’ve been fighting our whole lives for,” Jones said. “(Olympians) do it out of pure passion. They’re the most devoted athletes in the world and we’re trying to stay motivated and push through. But there’s a human element to this. Seeing this virus kill, and destroy so many cities, it’s hard to keep going on like nothing’s wrong out there.”

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Team Jennifer Jones adds free-agent all-star lead Lisa Weagle

All-star lead Lisa Weagle wasn’t a free agent for long.

Let go last week after a decade-long run with skip Rachel Homan’s Ottawa-based rink, she has joined Team Jennifer Jones.

The Winnipeg-based Jones rink, which includes third Kaitlyn Lawes, second Jocelyn Peterman and lead Dawn McEwen, will operate as a five-player team.

Jones and Weagle confirmed the news Wednesday morning in phone interviews with The Canadian Press. A formal team announcement was expected later in the day.

We connected instantly and our goals were aligned.— Lisa Weagle on her conversation with new teammate Jennifer Jones

“She’s just a super-talented player and one of the best leads to ever play the game,” Jones said. “She works hard on every aspect of her game. But at the end of the day, I think she’s a phenomenal person as well. So I think she’s just going to add a ton of value to our team in every aspect.”

Weagle’s departure from Team Homan was a stunner on the curling scene. They had won three national titles together and reached the Scotties Tournament of Hearts final last month in Moose Jaw, Sask.

‘I want to do everything I can to help the team’

Jones reached out to Weagle last Sunday and the five players firmed up plans for next season on a video call.

“We connected instantly and our goals were aligned,” Weagle said. “What struck me the most was hearing it in Jen’s voice that she wants to win and she’s very determined. This is an athlete that’s won everything there is to win in curling and she still wants to do more.

“That had me hooked and ready to go right away. I believe in her and I believe in her team and I want to do everything I can to help the team and be a part of it.”

The team plans to sort out the logistics of the five-player setup in the off-season.

Many teams use a fifth player as an alternate but they see limited ice time. That is not expected to be the case with Team Jones.

Busy week on domestic curling scene

Team Homan represented Canada at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics but did not reach the podium. Sarah Wilkes was brought on as Weagle’s replacement on Tuesday.

Team Jones won gold at the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. Jones is also a two-time world champion and six-time national champion.

The addition of Weagle is the latest move in a busy week on the domestic curling scene as several high-profile teams have made changes as they gear up to make a run at the 2021 Olympic Trials.

“We all have a little bit more jump in our step and we’re very excited,” Jones said. “We feel very privileged that Lisa would agree to play with us.

“A player of her talent, calibre, and just the person that she is, we feel it’s a huge privilege for us and we’re hoping that we can do some great things together.”

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6-time Canadian curling champion Jennifer Jones denied a 7th title

Jennifer Jones will have to wait for another chance to win a record seventh Canadian women’s curling championship.

The decorated skip believes she has the team and the time to get that opportunity.

Jones and her Winnipeg wild-card team fell 8-3 to Ontario’s Rachel Homan in Sunday’s semifinal at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts.

Homan advanced to the evening final against Manitoba’s Kerri Einarson for the title.

WATCH | Homan heads to Scotties final:

Ontario’s Rachel Homan scores 2 in the 9th end to seal the 8-3 victory over Wild Card’s Jennifer Jones.  0:27

The winner will represent Canada at the world championship March 14-22 in Prince George, B.C.

Jones, 45, is tied with Colleen Jones for the most national women’s championships won by a skip. She claimed the fifth of her six crowns five years ago in Moose Jaw, Sask.

Losing to Homan foiled her bid to win it again at Mosaic Place.

“You always think about it every time you step on the ice,” Jones said. “Not even about winning a record seven, but winning and representing Canada.

“I would have loved to have had an opportunity to represent Canada in Prince George. It always is terrible to lose, but at least we gave ourselves a chance this year.”

After Jones won her sixth title and a second career world championship in 2018, her longtime second Jill Officer retired. Jones, Officer, third Kaitlyn Lawes and lead Dawn McEwen won an Olympic gold medal in 2014.

Jones and Officer had curled together since their junior days. Jocelyn Peterman replaced Officer.

Jones speaks of her team as a work in progress despite her experienced lineup.

“We worked on a lot of things. I feel they’re all coming together,” the skip said. “We’re trending in the right direction which I love and having a ton of fun.”

‘We know we’re better than that’

Trailing 5-1 after five ends Sunday, Jones tried setting up multi-point ends to get back in the game. Homan shut the door on her with defensive hits and Jones shook hands after nine.

“The disappointing part is we know we’re better than that and we just let it get away too early,” Lawes said. “We knew we had to keep it close with them, especially because we’re such a great-hitting team.

“Obviously we come here and we want to win. We’ve built a lot over the last two seasons with this lineup. In the big picture, I’m really proud of where we’re at. I know we have a lot left in the tank.”

Homan’s team boasted shooting accuracy percentage of 91 per cent compared to wild-card’s 76 over the first five ends Sunday. Peterman struggled early at 68 per cent, which put pressure on Lawes to make runback doubles.

Jones was heavy on a draw in the second end to give up a steal of three. The skip was light on another draw to score two in the eighth and settled for one.

“It’s hard to come off a loss,” Jones said. “I get to go home to my kids and that’s always great.

“I am not a super-competitive person — people don’t believe that — except when it comes to curling.

“When we’re on the ice, we want to win. It doesn’t matter what we’ve won in the past. We’re in the moment and we’re just has hungry as we’ve ever been.”

In her 15th career Tournament of Hearts, Jones was the wild-card team for the first time. The wild-card was introduced to the national men’s and women’s championship in 2018.

After losing to Einarson in the Manitoba women’s final, Jones beat Tracy Fleury to gain entry into the main draw in Moose Jaw.

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CBC | Sports News