Tag Archives: Streaming

Beyoncé’s ‘Black Is King’ Is Streaming on Disney Plus: How to Watch the Visual Album

Beyoncé’s ‘Black Is King’ Is Streaming on Disney Plus: How to Watch the Visual Album | Entertainment Tonight

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Beyoncé’s ‘Black Is King’ Is Now Streaming on Disney Plus: How to Watch the Visual Album

Beyoncé’s ‘Black Is King’ Is Now Streaming on Disney Plus: How to Watch the Visual Album | Entertainment Tonight

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Beyoncé’s ‘Black Is King’ Is Now Streaming on Disney Plus: How to Watch the Visual Album

Beyoncé’s ‘Black Is King’ Is Now Streaming on Disney Plus: How to Watch the Visual Album | Entertainment Tonight

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Romantic Movies Streaming Guide: What to Watch This Valentine’s Day

Romantic Movies Streaming Guide: What to Watch This Valentine’s Day | Entertainment Tonight

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Microsoft Begins Testing Game Streaming From Xbox One Consoles

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Microsoft is in the process of testing its xCloud game streaming service, but that’s not the only way to get your Xbox games on more devices. The company has also launched a test of its new Xbox game streaming service. This streaming option has more hardware requirements, but it won’t require subscribing to a whole new service. 

Microsoft’s xCloud relies on a server someplace online to render games and stream the video to your devices. The upshot there is you don’t need to have an Xbox running to play Xbox games. The new Xbox Console Streaming feature does require you to have an Xbox One, and that piece of hardware does all the rendering and streaming. If you already have a big game library, that could make your streaming experience much better. 

Currently, the Xbox Console Streaming test is available to Xbox Insiders in the Alpha and Alpha Skip-Ahead rings, but only those in the US and UK. Once enabled, the streaming test lets you load up and render your library of games on the Xbox One you already have, and the console streams to your mobile device. 

You will need a few things in addition to the XboxSEEAMAZON_ET_135 See Amazon ET commerce in order to enjoy Console Streaming. Microsoft says your home internet needs at least 4.75 Mbps of upload (9 Mbps preferred) and 125 ms or less of latency (50 ms or less preferred). The Xbox needs to be configured for instant-on and connected to your network via an Ethernet cable — every little bit of latency counts in situations like this. 

Your console will tell you if something isn’t working.

The game streaming preview only works on Android devices running 6.0 Marshmallow or higher. You’ll also need a wireless Xbox controller with Bluetooth support. Microsoft also strongly suggests you pick up a controller mount for your phone. On the phone side, you need at least 4.75 Mbps down, but Microsoft still says 10 Mbps is preferable. 

Interestingly, Microsoft doesn’t mention anything about the local network conditions, and that suggests it won’t support direct streaming when you’re at home. It’s targeting game streaming to your phone while you’re out in the world. So, you might not get any latency benefits while you’re on your home network. 

Microsoft will expand the test to more regions and testing groups down the road. First, it wants to see how it works for Insiders.

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Streaming Services: Your Guide to Apple TV Plus, Disney Plus, HBO Max, Netflix and More

Streaming Services: Your Guide to Apple TV Plus, Disney Plus, HBO Max, Netflix and More | Entertainment Tonight

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Microsoft Is Accepting Sign-Ups for xCloud Game Streaming Preview

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Numerous technology powerhouses are investing in game streaming services, not the least of which is Microsoft. The company has shown off its xCloud game streaming a few times, including one suspicious on-stage demo. Now, it’s gearing up for the first wave of beta players, and you can sign up for a chance to get one of those preview spots

As with other game streaming platforms, xCloud will render games on servers in the cloud. The video of that gameplay streams down to your phone, laptop, TV, or other devices. Your controller inputs go back up to the server, allowing you to play the game. Several companies have tried and failed to combat latency and bandwidth issues that plague game streaming, but the technology is finally getting there. 

Eventually, xCloud will support streaming a wide array of Xbox games to many different devices. However, Microsoft has opted to keep the preview extremely limited. In addition to only allowing a small number of gamers give xCloud a shot, Microsoft will only let them play a handful of titles. The preview will have Gears 5, Halo 5: Guardians, Killer Instinct, and Sea of Thieves. Microsoft wants to gather data on how people use the service and will expand the game selection over time. 

If you want to sign up for the beta, you can do so on Microsoft’s xCloud website. To participate, you’ll need an Android phone running 6.0 Marshmallow or higher. While the plan is to support iOS eventually, the preview app will only be in the Google Play Store. You’ll also need a wireless Xbox controller — the phone mounting arm is optional, but you’ll probably want one. xCloud requires at least 10Mbps of download bandwidth, and 5GHz Wi-Fi is recommended. Mobile data should work fine as long as you’ve got low latency. Microsoft is planning a 5G streaming test in South Korea, too. 

Microsoft has not announced a start date for the xCloud preview, but we do know it will be limited to the US, UK, and South Korea. The company previously promised a preview would start in October, and that may still be the case. Although, the registration page does say that invites might be delayed by several months. Microsoft hasn’t talked about its business model for the final service, but the preview will be free.

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Streaming ‘Friends’: How a ’90s Sitcom Became Gen Z’s New Favorite Show

Streaming ‘Friends’: How a ’90s Sitcom Became Gen Z’s New Favorite Show | Entertainment Tonight

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Samsung’s PlayGalaxy Game Streaming Is Live on the Note 10

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The Galaxy Note 10 got most of the attention at Samsung’s recent Unpacked event, and quite understandably. Samsung also talked about its upcoming PlayGalaxy Link game streaming platform. PlayGalaxy wasn’t available when the Note 10 launched, but it has now started rolling out as a beta. This is your chance to (kind of) play desktop games on your smartphone. 

Samsung’s PlayGalaxy Link is similar to Nvidia GameStream — the game renders on your computer. The PlayGalaxy client encodes the video and streams it to your mobile device over the local network or the internet. Your control inputs go back to the PC, allowing you to play the game. It’s like a fancy, low-latency remote desktop. 

The get set up, you’ll need the desktop PlayGalaxy Link client, which is only available for Windows 10. You also need a reasonably powerful GPU (at least NVIDIA GTX 1060 or AMD Radeon RX 550), a Core i5 or higher, 8GB of RAM, and a gigabit router. The app strongly suggests having your PC wired to the router rather than connected via Wi-Fi.  The client should detect games on your PC, but it only spotted one for me. You can manually add more by directing it to the EXE files. On the phone side, there’s a PlayGalaxy Link app available in Samsung’s Galaxy Store.

PlayGalaxy Link is still in beta, and it only works on the Note 10 and Note 10+ for the time being, More Samsung phones will get support soon, though. There’s support for wired and Bluetooth game controllers, which make desktop games playable on a phone. If you choose to use the on-screen controls, well, good luck. Even on the gigantic Note 10+, the screen is too small to play a complex game with on-screen buttons effectively. 

There’s no additional cost to use PlayGalaxy Link since you already own the games and are running them on your PC. However, don’t expect miracles right now. The app truly earns its beta label right now. The client connects and launches games reliably, but the video lag is substantial from my testing. You’d have little hope of playing a real-time game, but something turn-based might be feasible. 

If Samsung can get the kinks worked out, PlayGalaxy Link could be an additional selling point for the company’s high-end phones. It’s tough to get people to drop $ 1,000 on a phone, and every little bit helps.

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CBS Is Streaming Its Original Apollo 11 Landing Coverage

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Fifty years ago yesterday, the Apollo 11 mission took off for the Moon. You can see CBS’s coverage now on YouTube, showcasing not just what happened, but how it happened. It’s the same way you, your parents, or your grandparents saw the event.

I am admittedly not much for watching video. I use YouTube almost exclusively for listening to music when I use it at all. But there’s something fascinating about seeing the real-time broadcast, complete with commercials and with breaking news coverage of then-current events happening in… well, not “real-time” obviously, but what real-time looked like 50 years ago. The original launch occurred at 9:32 AM on July 16, 1969, with the later lunar touchdown on July 20. Armstrong actually stepped out on the lunar surface six hours later.

Watching the full live stream is fascinating for another reason — it highlights the degree to which both the takeoff and landing were extended, live affairs, carried out over hours with extensive footage. The idea that the moon landing was some kind of hoax carried out by Stanley Kubrick or through some other form of visual effects wizardry has been debunked more times (and from more angles) than I can think of. But one of the better treatments of the topic is by S. G. Collins of Postwar Media.

Collins details in the video above why the special effects technology of the 1960s literally wasn’t capable of this kind of feat. Both launches and landings were live broadcasts that went on for hours and were seen by millions of people worldwide. Today, those kinds of issues would be no object for special effects wizards to solve. Fifty years ago, it was an entirely different matter.

I hadn’t planned on watching any of the moon landing details this weekend, but after watching some of the Apollo 11 launch broadcast I may change that plan. Seeing the moon landing lift-off sent chills up my spine, grainy video and bad color reproduction be damned. Seeing the Saturn V in action is a joy, blurry video and all.

It is unfortunate that the triumph of Apollo 11 and the following Apollo missions remain the last time we have sent humans to another world beyond our own. I do not know if I’ll be around when the 100th anniversary of Apollo rolls around, but I hope that by the time we hit the 75th — and I do hope to be around for that one — we’ll be able to say that we eventually exceeded the achievements of my grandfather’s generation. “We came in peace for all mankind” is too good of a slogan to leave it isolated and alone on the lunar surface. There are further worlds, farther worlds, to explore. Hopefully, one day, we’ll reach them.

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