Tag Archives: Championships

Watch the figure skating world championships

Click on the video player above to watch live figure skating action from the 2021 ISU World Figure Skating Championships from Stockholm, Sweden.

Coverage continues on Wednesday with the pairs short program at 1:15 p.m. ET. Check below for the full live streaming schedule.

Stick around after the competitions for more coverage of the 2021 worlds with the hosts of CBC Sports’ That Figure Skating Show, Asher Hill and Dylan Moscovitch. The former Canadian national team members will break down the short program results live immediately following each competition on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.


WATCH | Eric Radford joins us live following the pairs short program, approx. 6 p.m. ET:


You can also catch more figure skating action on Road to the Olympic Games, streaming on Saturday at 2 p.m. ET and on Sunday at 12 p.m. ET. Check local listings for television broadcast times.

Full schedule

Wednesday, March 24: Ladies short program (5:05 a.m. ET), pairs short program (1:15 p.m. ET)

Thursday, March 25: Men’s short program (6:35 a.m. ET), pairs free program (1:05 p.m. ET)

Friday, March 26: Ice dance rhythm dance (5:45 a.m. ET), ladies free skate (12:55 p.m. ET)

Saturday, March 27: Men’s free program (5:55 a.m. ET), ice dance free dance (11:55 a.m. ET)

Sunday, March 28: Gala exhibition (8:30 a.m. ET)

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CBC | Sports News

Chen vs. Hanyu headlines an odd figure skating world championships

This is an excerpt from The Buzzer, which is CBC Sports’ daily email newsletter. Stay up to speed on what’s happening in sports by subscribing here.

The figure skating world championships are back

Last year’s event, which was supposed to be held in Montreal, was cancelled due to the pandemic. And the virus put a major dent in the current season too. Two of the six regular Grand Prix stops were called off (including Skate Canada International), and so was the Grand Prix Final.

The four Grand Prix events that went ahead were, with some exceptions, limited to skaters living in the country in which they were held. The only Canadian allowed to compete all season was Alaska-based Keegan Messing, who took bronze in the men’s event at Skate America in October. The Canadian championships were cancelled, as were the Europeans. Even skaters from countries with relatively loose restrictions (Americans, Russians and Japanese, for example) were hampered by a lack of quality international competition.

  • That Figure Skating Show will be live on CBC Sports YouTube channel right after every #stockholm2021 short program. Join hosts Dylan & Asher & special guests as they react, provide insight and spill the tea on worlds.

All this makes it harder to predict what will happen at the world championships, which run Wednesday through Saturday (plus the gala finale on Sunday) in Stockholm. Here are a couple of storylines to follow:

Nathan Chen vs. Yuzuru Hanyu

Chen is trying to become the first skater to win three straight men’s world titles since Canada’s Patrick Chan did it from 2011-13. The 21-year-old American’s athleticism is unmatched. He has the talent to pull off every jump in the book, and he’s actually done it. Chen is the first skater to land five different types of quads in competition.

This gives Chen a higher ceiling than any other skater. But he still has to execute cleanly. We saw both sides of the coin at the 2018 Olympics, where a disastrous short program put Chen in 17th place. Then he blew the doors off everyone in the free skate, attempting six quads and landing five of them (both unprecedented) to easily win the segment and climb all the way up to fifth in the final standings.

Since that unforgettable skate, Chen is undefeated. He won gold at the 2018 and ’19 world championships and took all seven of the Grand Prix events he entered — including a pair of Finals.

Chen’s toughest rival in Stockholm is Hanyu, who won that 2018 Olympic competition to become the first repeat men’s gold medallist in more than six decades. The 26-year-old Japanese star also owns two world titles (2014 and ’17) and was the runner-up to Chen in 2018.

Can Canada get back on the podium?

Things have been a little rough here since the brilliant 2017-18 season. That’s when Canada won four Olympic medals — gold in the team event and by Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir in ice dance, bronze by Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford in pairs and by Kaetlyn Osmond in the women’s — and Osmond went on to win gold at the world championships. Every one of those athletes is now retired, along with Chan.

The transition to a new crop of skaters hasn’t gone smoothly. Canada got shut out of the medals at the 2019 world championships, where its best finish in the solo events was an 11th by Gabby Daleman. Kaitlyn Weaver and Andrew Poje placed fifth in the dance, but they’ve since stepped away from the sport.

That leaves Piper Gilles and Paul Poirier (seventh in the dance in 2019) and Kirsten Moore-Towers and Michael Marinaro (seventh in pairs) as Canada’s leading medal hopes at this year’s worlds. Gilles and Poirier won two Grand Prix medals during the last full season, and the decision by reigning dance world champions Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron of France to skip this year’s event gives the Canadians a better shot to reach the world-championship podium for the first time. Marjorie Lajoie and Zachary Lagha are a promising young dance team that won the world junior title in 2019, but it takes time to become a contender in their discipline and they have only one (podium-less) Grand Prix season under their belts. 

Messing is the only Canadian entry in the men’s event, where a medal looks like a stretch for him. Emily Bausback and Madeline Schizas are in tough in the women’s competition, where a trio of Russians — Anna Shcherbakova, Aleksandra Trusova and Yelizaveta Tuktamysheva — might sweep the podium.

Whether they can win medals or not, it’s important for every Canadian to place as high as they can in Stockholm because the results will help determine how many entries each country gets in the 2022 Olympics. Read more about that in this story by CBC Sports’ Jacqueline Doorey, and read her preview of all four competitions at the worlds here.

Every program at the world championships will be streamed live on CBCSports.ca and the CBC Sports app, starting with the women’s short Wednesday at 5:10 a.m. ET, followed by the pairs short at 1:30 p.m. ET. Right after each program, That Figure Skating Show goes live on CBC Sports’ YouTube channel, where hosts Dylan Moscovitch and Asher Hill and special guests will give their instant reactions and insights. This weekend’s Road to the Olympic Games shows on the CBC TV network will have more worlds coverage, featuring commentary from Brenda Irving and Kurt Browning. See the full TV and streaming schedules here.

WATCH | Looking ahead at the figure skating worlds:

Jacqueline Doorey breaks down the upcoming World Figure Skating Championships with ‘That Figure Skating Show’ star Asher Hill. 5:27

Quickly…

Canada hit a bit of a bump in Olympic men’s soccer qualifying. Yesterday’s 0-0 draw vs. Haiti dropped the under-24 Canadian team’s record to 1-0-1. But it can still advance to the semifinals with a win or a tie in its group-stage finale Thursday vs. Honduras (also 1-0-1). If Canada moves on, its semifinal opponent will be either Mexico or the United States. The winners of the semifinals get the final two spots in this summer’s Olympic men’s tournament.

The men’s Sweet Sixteen is set. Three of the four No. 1 seeds in the NCAA men’s basketball bracket advanced to the third round. But, as usual, Cinderellas are the story of the tournament. A 15 seed (Oral Roberts), a 12 (Oregon State) and a pair of 11s (UCLA and Syracuse) all crashed the Sweet Sixteen, which takes place Saturday and Sunday. If you’re looking for a team to cheer for, 7 seed Oregon’s top two scorers from the regular season are Canadian, and they both played a big role in yesterday’s upset of 2 seed Iowa. Chris Duarte had team highs in points (23) and assists (seven), and Eugene Omoruyi added 17 points, six rebounds and five assists. The women’s second round begins today with eight games, including title-game favourites UConn and Stanford taking on Syracuse and Oklahoma State, respectively. Watch for UConn’s Canadian forward Aaliyah Edwards, who had 17 points and 12 rebounds in the first round.

The UEFA Women’s Champions League quarter-finals start tomorrow, and there’s at least one Canadian player in every match. The 1 p.m. ET meeting between Paris St-Germain and defending champion Lyon is especially interesting. It’s a rematch of a 2020 semifinal, which Lyon won en route to taking its fifth consecutive title. And it features three members of the Canadian national team — Lyon’s Kadeisha Buchanan and PSG’s Jordyn Huitema and Ashley Lawrence. The other Canadians in the quarters are Janine Beckie (Manchester City), Jessie Fleming (Chelsea) and Stephanie Labbe (Rosengard). The quarter-finals are two-leg, home-and-home affairs, with the return legs happening March 31 or April 1. For an in-depth and entertaining preview of the quarter-finals, read today’s edition of The GIST newsletter and consider subscribing if you haven’t already. It’s written and run by Canadian women who always have a strong and fun perspective on the biggest stories in sports.

The National Women’s Hockey League is set to add another Canadian team. A year after expanding to Toronto, the NWHL is reportedly adding Montreal as its seventh franchise. The other five teams are all based in the U.S. The NWHL is completing its Isobel Cup playoffs this weekend in Boston, where top-seeded Toronto will play the Boston Pride in one of Friday’s semifinals and the Minnesota Whitecaps will face the Connecticut Whale in the other. The winners meet in the final Saturday night. The final two rounds were postponed in February after multiple teams experienced COVID-19 outbreaks at the NWHL’s Lake Placid hub.

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Lack of competition the wild card in figure skating world championships

It’s been two years since figure skaters have had a world championship, and one year without international competition at all.

But all that changes March 22 with the start of this year’s figure skating world championships in Stockholm, Sweden.

The event is going ahead despite COVID-19 still being a major factor in many participating countries. And although there is no required quarantine upon arrival in Sweden, athletes will be tested before they leave, again upon arrival and will be in a bubble while continuing to be tested throughout the six days of competition. 

COVID-19 protocols aren’t the only thing making this world championship unique. Because each country was hit by the pandemic differently, skaters come into competition with different levels of preparation. For example, Russia saw fewer restrictions than most countries so skaters competed fairly regularly, albeit nationally, throughout the season. Compare that with Canadian skaters who saw multiple lockdowns and faced varying restrictions pending on their province, stopping them from training. Canadian Nationals were cancelled and the only competition in the past year was one held virtually.

Throw world titles and qualification spots for next year’s Beijing Olympics into the mix and it’s safe to say this world championship is unlike any other.

CBC Sports has complete coverage of the week’s events, starting Wednesday with live streams of every event available on CBC.ca/Sports and the CBC Sports app. The full schedule is at cbc.ca/sports/broadcast. Coverage continues this weekend on Road to the Olympic Games with Brenda Irving and Kurt Browning providing commentary.

  • That Figure Skating Show will be live on CBC Sports YouTube channel right after every #stockholm2021 short program. Join hosts Dylan & Asher & special guests as they react, provide insight and spill the tea on Worlds 

WATCH | Preview of championships:

Jacqueline Doorey breaks down the upcoming World Figure Skating Championships with ‘That Figure Skating Show’ star Asher Hill. 5:27

Ice dance

With reigning world champions Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron from France opting out of this season to prepare for the Olympics, the chance for a world title has never been better for Canadians Piper Gilles and Paul Poirier. The duo, who train in Toronto, saw incredible success prior to the sports shutdown with a gold at Skate America and silver at both the Rostelecom Cup and Four Continents Championship. Plus, they’re coming back with their 2019-20 programs — their freeskate to Joni Mitchell’s Both Sides Now being a fan favourite — so expect an inspired performance no matter what. But depending on how slippery the ice is that day, the American and Russian teams could very well take up the podium. So expect a tight race. 

Canadians to watch: Ice dance is Canada’s best event and the country is sending three teams, with the second spot going to Laurence Fournier-Beaudry and Nikolaj Sorensen. The Montreal-pair haven’t been seen internationally in over a year because of a knee injury Sorensen suffered back in 2019, which of course was followed by the pandemic hiatus. They’ll be joined by Marjorie Lajoie and Zachary Lagha, who also train in Montreal and are in their second senior season and experiencing their first senior world championship.


The men’s competition should again come down to a battle between American Nathan Chen, right, and Japan’s Yuzuru Hanyu, left. (Associated Press)

Men

It’s a battle of the giants: Japan’s Yuzuru Hanyu versus American Nathan Chen. These two are the most dominant male skaters in the world, each fantastic at both the artistic and technical side of the sport. Hanyu, 26, is an older skater who’s conditioning and asthma sometimes holds him back, but the year off may have given him fresh legs. And since he didn’t compete this season to avoid COVID-19, worlds will be the first look at him in over a year. On the other hand Chen, 21, is a young phenom who was world champion in 2018 and 2019, so no doubt he’s looking to make it a three-peat.

Canadians to watch: Despite having multiple talented skaters like Nam Nguyen and Roman Sadovsky who could be competitive at worlds, Canada had only one quota spot which went to Keegan Messing. The 29-year-old lives and trains in Alaska and this will be the veteran’s third world championship and he no doubt hopes to win his first worlds medal. But the technical elements are becoming harder and more common, so Messing will have to land all his quads and triples to be competitive. 

Women

Looks like te Russia could sweep the podium, even with 2020 Grand Prix final champion Alena Kostornaia unable to compete due to injury and sickness. But Anna Shcherbakova, Alexandra Trusova and Elizaveta Tuktamysheva are all on deck and have the technical skills to sweep the event. However, Japan’s Rika Kihira and South Korea’s Young You could sneak onto the podium. Expect to see lots of quads and triple axels as the women’s event is more technical than ever before.


Milton, Ont.’s Madeline Schizas is one of the young skaters competing in their first worlds. (Nathan Denette/Canadian Press)

Canadians to watch: Canada’s women’s skating program is in a building phase. This will be Madeline Schizas and Emily Bausback’s first senior world championships. Schizas, who is 18 and trains in Milton, Ont., won the recent Skate Canada Virtual Challenge and wants to skate two, personal best programs in Sweden. Bausback, also 18, trains in Burnaby, B.C and will try to recreate the fire that helped her become national champion back in 2019. So worlds will be a glimpse at the next chapter of Canadian women’s skating. 

Pairs

A Canadian pair could get their first world medal. Kirsten Moore-Towers (28) and Michael Marinaro (29) train in Oakville, Ont., and have skated together since 2014. They head to worlds with two very solid programs but they’ll have to skate their best to beat the Russian teams and the gold-medal favourites Sui Wenjing and Han Cong from China. This will be easier said than done considering their lack of competition opportunities this year, however, the duo said they’ve never trained harder in their careers and are feeling confident. 

Canadians to watch: Evelyn Walsh (19) and Trennt Michaud (24) will join Moore-Towers and Marinao representing Canada. The pair trains in Brantford, Ont., and this is their first senior worlds. Moore-Towers mentioned she’d love to place well in worlds to help Canada’s chances at two quota spots for Beijing 2022, in hopes Marsh and Michaud will get the opportunity to go to their first Games next year. 

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CBC | Sports News

Watch Road to the Olympic Games: Snowboard world championships

Click on the video player above to watch Road to the Olympic Games, our weekly program spotlighting the best high-performance athletes from Canada and around the world.

On this week’s edition of the program, watch action from the snowboard world championships in Aspen, Colo.

Coverage copntinues on Saturday at 5 p.m. ET with the halfpipe event.

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CBC | Sports News

Watch the 2021 freestyle skiing world championships

Click on the video player above to watch live action from the freestyle skiing world championships in Aspen, Colo.

Live coverage begins on Friday at 3 p.m. ET with the halfpipe competition.

Return on Saturday at 11:30 a.m. ET for the slopestyle event.

For more freestyle skiing coverage, tune into Road to the Olympic Games on Saturday at 2 p.m. ET and 4 p.m. ET.

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CBC | Sports News

Watch Road to the Olympic Games: Short track world championships

Short Track·Live

Watch Road to the Olympic Games, our weekly program spotlighting the best high-performance athletes from Canada and around the world. On this week’s edition of the program, watch action from the short track speed skating world championships in Dordrecht, Netherlands.

Coverage continues on Sunday at 12 p.m. ET

Watch world-class speed skating competition on the ice in Dordrecht, the Netherlands. 0:00

Click on the video player above on Sunday at 12 p.m. ET to watch Road to the Olympic Games, our weekly program spotlighting the best high-performance athletes from Canada and around the world.

On this week’s edition of the program, watch action from the short track speed skating world championships in Dordrecht, Netherlands.

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CBC | Sports News

Watch Road to the Olympic Games: Alpine skiing world championships

Alpine Skiing·Live

Watch Road to the Olympic Games, our weekly program spotlighting the best high-performance athletes from Canada and around the world. On this week’s edition of the program, watch action from the alpine skiing world championships in Cortina, Italy.

Coverage continues on Sunday at 1 p.m. ET

Watch some of the best skiers in the world compete in Cortina, Italy. 0:00

Click on the video player above on Sunday at 1 p.m. ET to watch Road to the Olympic Games, our weekly program spotlighting the best high-performance athletes from Canada and around the world.

On this week’s edition of the program, watch action from the men’s downhill at the alpine skiing world championships in Cortina, Italy.

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CBC | Sports News

Watch the 2021 speed skating world championships

Click on the video player above to watch live action from the 2021 speed skating world championships in Heerenveen, Netherlands. 

Coverage continues on Saturday at 7:35 a.m. ET, and on Sunday beginning at 6:25 a.m. ET.

For more coverage of this event, stream Road to the Olympic Games on Sunday at 12 p.m. ET. 

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CBC | Sports News

It’s world championships season for winter Olympic sports

This is an excerpt from The Buzzer, which is CBC Sports’ daily email newsletter. Stay up to speed on what’s happening in sports by subscribing here.

Quick note before we get started: no newsletter tomorrow or on the holiday Monday. Back Tuesday.

It’s winter world championships season

Several winter Olympic sports are holding their world championships right now. Here’s what’s going on:

Speed skating

The worlds opened today at the same oval in the Netherlands where Canadians won 11 medals in the two meets that made up the pandemic-shortened World Cup season. Canada got off to a slow start — its best result today was a fifth by Isabelle Weidemann in the women’s 3,000 metres.

But tomorrow could be a huge day with strong Canadian medal contenders in three of the four events. Canada won both World Cup races in the women’s team pursuit and finished second and third in the two men’s team pursuits. Laurent Dubreuil reached the podium in three of the four men’s 500-metre races this season. Watch Friday’s races live from 9 a.m. to noon ET here.

Alpine skiing

Rough weather in northern Italy forced the start of the worlds to be delayed by three days. But they finally got going today and Canada’s Brodie Seger had the race of his life. The 25-year-old, who had never finished in the top 12 of a World Cup or world championship race, came just four hundredths of a second — shorter than a blink of an eye — from winning a medal. He finished fourth in the men’s super-G, which was won by Vincent Kriechmayr for the Austrian’s first world title.

The women’s super-G also went to a first-time world champ from Switzerland: Lara Gut-Behrami, who had previously won five medals at the worlds and another at the Olympics, but none of them gold. Defending champion Mikaela Shiffrin took bronze in her first speed race (super-G or downhill) in more than a year. Marie-Michele Gagnon was the top Canadian, finishing sixth.

The next events are the downhills. Watch the women’s Saturday at 5 a.m. ET and the men’s Sunday at 5 a.m. ET here.

Snowboard and ski cross

Canadian teenager Eliot Grondin won his first world-championship medal today by taking bronze in the men’s snowboard cross event. No Canadians advanced past the quarter-finals in the women’s competition.

The snowboard cross team event goes tomorrow. Watch it live at 6:30 a.m. ET here.

The ski cross world championships are Saturday. Canada’s Reece Howden has won three of the last four men’s World Cup races and leads the season standings. Marielle Thompson ranks second in the women’s chase and has reached the podium in five of the last six events. Watch the world championship races Saturday starting at 6:30 a.m. ET on CBCSports.ca and the CBC Sports app.

Bobsleigh and skeleton

They opened last week with the great German pilot Francesco Friedrich winning his seventh consecutive world title in the two-man event and Kaillie Humphries grabbing her record fourth women’s gold. Her first two (in 2012 and ’13) came while competing for Canada, but she’s won the last two women’s world titles for the U.S. after a bitter falling out with the Canadian program led to her departure.

The skeleton competitions opened today with the first two runs of the men’s and women’s events. The top Canadian was Jane Channell, who’s seventh heading into the final two legs tomorrow.

Canada will have a better shot at a medal in the four-man bobsleigh event, where pilot Justin Kripps’ sled ranks third in the World Cup standings. That race begins Saturday and finishes Sunday. Same for the women’s monobob — an event that’s being added to the Olympics next year. Watch all the bobsleigh and skeleton world championship races live here.

Sainte-Marie, Quebec’s Eliot Grondin captured a world championship bronze medal in snowboard cross Thursday in Idre Fjäll, Sweden. 4:59

Quickly…

The head of the Tokyo Olympics is reportedly stepping down. Organizing committee president Yoshiro Mori got himself in trouble last week when he complained that meetings with a lot of women in them “take so much time” and that “if their speaking time isn’t restricted to a certain extent, they have difficulty finishing, which is annoying.” The 83-year-old later issued a ham-fisted apology, but calls for his resignation were still trending on Japanese Twitter today and female politicians wore white to a House of Representatives session to protest Mori’s sexist remarks. Also — and this is probably what really did Mori in — some big Olympic sponsors criticized him after being threatened with boycotts. According to several reports in Japan, Mori will resign tomorrow. Read more about the controversy here.

The Raptors are staying in Tampa for the rest of the season. They’d hoped to return to Toronto for the second half, but ongoing border restrictions and the general pandemic situation forced them to give up on that. Playing out of Tampa’s Amalie Arena, the Raptors started the season 2-8 but have improved since. At 12-13 they sit fifth in the Eastern Conference and can get to .500 with a win at Boston tonight. Maybe some of the “Champa Bay” vibes are rubbing off. Tampa is now home to the reigning Super Bowl and Stanley Cup champions and, by the looks of things, everyone there is living their best life.

Someone in Australia really dislikes Rafael Nadal. A woman was thrown out of his Australian Open match today for heckling Nadal and giving him the finger. It didn’t throw him off: the gentlemanly Spaniard seemed genuinely amused (“Maybe she took too much gin or tequila,” he said later) and cruised to a straight-sets win. Meanwhile, defending women’s champion Sofia Kenin found herself on the wrong side of a blowout, falling in just 64 minutes to 65th-ranked Kaia Kanepi. Tonight, Canadians Denis Shapovalov and Felix Auger-Aliassime face each other in the men’s third round at 3 a.m. ET. The only other Canadian singles player remaining, Milos Raonic, plays at 1 a.m. ET. Watch video of Nadal’s strange encounter and read more about all the notable Day 4 action here.

And finally…

Remember The Rick Nash Goal? It happened in a Blue Jackets-Coyotes game in the dog days of the 2007-08 season, so there’s no real historical significance to it. But, for pure aesthetics, it’s tough to top Nash’s video-game-like moves to undress a pair of Coyotes defencemen before beating goalie Mikael Tellqvist. For a fresh perspective on one of the prettiest goals ever scored, check out the latest episode of Rob Pizzo’s terrific I was in net for… series. Tellqvist explains how the “sick” play unfolded from his point of view, and how he almost foiled it at the last second. Watch the video here:

In episode 12, Rob Pizzo speaks to goalie Mikael Tellqvist about the time the Blue Jackets star turned the Coyotes inside out. 5:55

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