Tag Archives: dies

Myanmar official dies in custody as junta cracks down on media

An official from deposed Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD) died in custody after he was arrested early on Tuesday — the second party figure to die in detention in two days — as security forces broke up street protests against the military junta.

Police also cracked down on independent media, raiding the offices of two news outlets and detaining two journalists.

Myanmar has been in crisis since the army ousted Suu Kyi’s elected government in a coup on Feb. 1, detained her and other NLD officials, and set up a ruling junta of generals.

The NLD’s Zaw Myat Linn died in custody on Tuesday after he was arrested in Yangon around 1:30 a.m. local time, said Ba Myo Thein, a member of the dissolved upper house of parliament.

“He’s been participating continuously in the protests,” Ba Myo Thein said. The cause of death was not clear.


A protester gets Coca-Cola poured on his face in an attempt to diminish the effects of tear gas during a demonstration in Yangon. (AFP/Getty Images)

In a Facebook live broadcast before he was detained, Zaw Myat Linn urged people to continue fighting the army, “even if it costs our lives.”

“Their power must never last,” he said.

Neither the military nor the police responded to calls for comment.

Tear gas, stun grenades used to disperse protesters

Zaw Myat Linn is the second NLD official to have died in custody in the last two days. Khin Maung Latt, who had worked as a campaign manager for an NLD MP elected in 2020, died after he was arrested on Saturday night.

More than 1,900 people have been arrested across the country since the coup, the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners said.

Police broke up scattered demonstrations in Yangon — the former capital and still the commercial hub — and other towns across Myanmar with tear gas and stun grenades on Tuesday.


This still image from social media video shows anti-coup demonstrators in Loikaw, Myanmar, fleeing tear gas. (Mizzima Burmese/Reuters)

As night fell, soldiers fired weapons in different districts of the coastal town of Dawei, while at least two people were wounded earlier in the day, one by a gunshot, in the town of Mohnyin in the north, local media said.

Witnesses said two journalists from Kamayut, an independent media company, were arrested, while the military raided the offices of Mizzima News in Yangon.

Live footage posted to social media also showed a raid after nightfall on the offices of the Democratic Voice of Burma (DVB).

A day earlier, the junta stripped Mizzima, DVB, and three other outlets of their licences. They had all been active in covering protests against the coup.

At least 35 journalists have been arrested since the Feb. 1 coup, Myanmar Now reported, of which 19 have been released.

The U.S State Department said it “strongly condemned the junta for the … violent crackdowns on those peacefully taking to the streets and on those who are just doing their jobs, including independent journalists who have been swept up.”

Daily protests against the coup are being staged across the country and security forces have cracked down harshly. More than 60 protesters have been killed and more than 1,800 detained, the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), an advocacy group, has said.

Ambassador to U.K. recalled

International powers have condemned the takeover, which derailed a slow transition to democracy in a country that has been ruled by the military for long periods since independence from Britain in 1947.

The army has justified the coup by saying that a November election won by the NLD was marred by fraud — a claim rejected by the electoral commission. It has promised a new election, but has not said when that might be held.

The junta said on Tuesday it was recalling its ambassador to the United Kingdom a day after he urged them in a statement to release Suu Kyi, state media reported.


Anti-coup demonstrators in Yangon spray fire extinguishers over a barricade. (Reuters)

The MRTV news channel said Kyaw Swar Min, one of several ambassadors to publicly break from the military line, had released the statement without following orders.

The military has brushed off condemnation of its actions, as it has in past periods of army rule when outbreaks of protest were bloodily repressed.

It is also under pressure from a civil disobedience movement that has crippled government business and from strikes at banks, factories and shops that have shut much of Yangon this week.

The European Union is preparing to widen its sanctions to target army-run businesses, according to diplomats and two internal documents seen by Reuters.

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CBC | World News

Olympics gymnastics coach with ties to Larry Nassar dies by suicide after charges

A former U.S. Olympics gymnastics coach with ties to disgraced sports doctor Larry Nassar killed himself Thursday, hours after being charged with turning his Michigan gym into a hub of human trafficking by coercing girls to train and then abusing them, authorities said.

John Geddert was supposed to appear in an Eaton County court, near Lansing, Mich. His body was found at a rest area along Interstate 96, according to state police. No other details were immediately released.

“This is a tragic end to a tragic story for everyone involved,” Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said.

Nessel earlier announced that Geddert was charged with two dozen crimes, including sexual assault, human trafficking and running a criminal enterprise. The charges were the latest fallout from the sexual abuse scandal involving Nassar, a former Michigan State University sports doctor now in prison.

Geddert, 63, was head coach of the 2012 U.S. women’s Olympic gymnastics team, which won a gold medal. He was long associated with Nassar, who was the Olympic team’s doctor and also treated injured gymnasts at Twistars, Geddert’s Lansing-area gym.

Among the charges, Geddert was accused of lying to investigators in 2016 when he denied ever hearing complaints about Nassar. But the bulk of the case against him involved his gym in Dimondale and how he treated the young athletes whose families paid to have them train under him.

The charges against Geddert had “very little to do” with Nassar, said Assistant Attorney General Danielle Hagaman-Clark.

‘It can happen to anyone, anywhere’

Geddert was charged with using his strong reputation in gymnastics to commit a form of human trafficking by making money through the forced labour of young athletes.

“The victims suffer from disordered eating, including bulimia and anorexia, suicide attempts and attempts at self harm, excessive physical conditioning, repeatedly being forced to perform even when injured, extreme emotional abuse and physical abuse, including sexual assault,” Nessel said.

“Many of these victims still carry these scars from this behaviour to this day.”

The attorney general acknowledged that the case might not fit the common understanding of human trafficking.

“We think of it predominantly as affecting people of colour or those without means to protect themselves … but honestly it can happen to anyone, anywhere,” she said. “Young, impressionable women may at times be vulnerable and open to trafficking crimes, regardless of their stature in the community or the financial well-being of their families.”

Geddert was suspended by Indianapolis-based USA Gymnastics during the Nassar scandal. In 2018, he told families he was retiring.

On his LinkedIn page, Geddert described himself as the “most decorated women’s gymnastics coach in Michigan gymnastics history.” He said his Twistars teams won 130 club championships.

But Geddert was often portrayed in unflattering ways when Nassar’s victims spoke during court hearings in 2018.

“What a great best friend John was to Larry for giving him an entire world where he was able to abuse so easily,” said gymnast Lindsey Lemke. “You two sure do have a funny meaning of friendship. You, John Geddert, also deserve to sit behind bars right next to Larry.”

Rachael Denhollander, the first gymnast to publicly accuse Nassar of sexual abuse in 2016, said she was proud of the women who stepped forward against Geddert.

“So much pain and grief for everyone,” she said on Twitter after Geddert’s death. “To the survivors, you have been heard and believed, and we stand with you.”

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CBC | World News

Gerry Marsden, U.K. singer of You’ll Never Walk Alone soccer anthem, dies at 78

Gerry Marsden, the British singer who was instrumental in turning a song from the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Carousel into one of the great anthems in the world of football, has died. He was 78.

His friend Pete Price said on Instagram after speaking to Marsden’s family that the Gerry and the Pacemakers frontman died after a short illness related to a heart infection.

“I’m sending all the love in the world to (his wife) Pauline and his family,” he said. “You’ll Never Walk Alone.”

Marsden was the lead singer of the band that found fame in the Merseybeat scene in the 1960s. Though another Liverpool band — The Beatles — reached superstardom, Gerry and the Pacemakers will always have a place in the city’s consciousness because of You’ll Never Walk Alone.

“I thought what a beautiful song. I’m going to tell my band we’re going to play that song,” Marsden told The Associated Press in 2018 when recalling the first time he heard the song at the cinema. “So I went back and told my buddies we’re doing a ballad called You’ll Never Walk Alone.

WATCH | Gerry Marsden performs You’ll Never Walk Alone at Liverpool game:

Marsden is best known for his band’s rendition of the song from Carousel, which was a 1945 musical that became a feature film in 1956.

The Pacemakers’ cover version was released in October 1963 and became the band’s third No. 1 hit on the British singles chart.

It was adopted by fans of the soccer club Liverpool and is sung with spine-tingling passion before each home game of the 19-time English champion — before coronavirus restrictions have meant that many matches have been played in empty stadiums.

Its lyrics, showcasing unity and perseverance through adversity — including “When you walk through a storm, Hold your head up high, And don’t be afraid of the dark” — have been a rallying cry for the Liverpool faithful and the song’s title are on the Liverpool club crest.


A ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’ banner is seen prior to a match between Liverpool and West Ham United in Liverpool, England, in October 2020. (Peter Powell/Pool/Getty Images)

The song has also been adopted by supporters of Scotland’s Celtic and Germany’s Borussia Dortmund.

Liverpool tweeted alongside a video of the fans in full voice that Marsden’s voice “accompanied our biggest nights” and that his “anthem bonded players, staff and fans around the world, helping create something truly special.”

‘Liverpool legend’

The song was embraced during the outset of the coronavirus pandemic last spring when a cover of the song, which featured Second World War veteran Tom Moore, reached number one. Moore had captivated the British public by walking 100 laps of his garden in England in the run-up to his 100th birthday in April to raise some 33 million pounds ($ 57 million Cdn) for the National Health Service.

The Cavern Club in Liverpool, the music venue which was the venue for many of The Beatles’ early gigs, described Marsden as a “legend” and a “very good friend.”


Marsden leaps over fellow Gerry & the Pacemakers band members in this April 1964 photo. (PA via AP)

In 1962, Beatles manager Brian Epstein signed up the band and their first three releases reached No. 1 in 1963 — How Do You Do It? and I Like It as well as You’ll Never Walk Alone. Later hits included Ferry Cross the Mersey and Don’t Let the Sun Catch You Crying. The group split in 1967 and Marsden pursued a solo career before reforming the band a few years later.

Frankie Goes To Hollywood singer Holly Johnson, who is from Liverpool and covered Ferry Across The Mersey tweeted that Marsden was a “Liverpool legend.”

Marsden is survived by his wife Pauline, whom he married in 1965. The couple had two daughters.

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CBC | Soccer News

Louisiana Congressman-elect Luke Letlow dies from COVID-19

Luke Letlow, Louisiana’s incoming Republican member of the U.S. House, died Tuesday night from complications related to COVID-19 only days before he would have been sworn into office. He was 41.

Letlow spokesman Andrew Bautsch confirmed the congressman-elect’s death at Ochsner-LSU Health Shreveport.

“The family appreciates the numerous prayers and support over the past days but asks for privacy during this difficult and unexpected time,” Bautsch said in a statement. “A statement from the family along with funeral arrangements will be announced at a later time.”

Louisiana’s eight-member congressional delegation called Letlow’s death devastating.

“Luke had such a positive spirit, and a tremendously bright future ahead of him. He was looking forward to serving the people of Louisiana in Congress, and we were excited to welcome him to our delegation where he was ready to make an even greater impact on our state and our nation,” they said in a statement.

The state’s newest congressman, set to take office in January, was admitted to a Monroe hospital on Dec. 19 after testing positive for the coronavirus disease. He was later transferred to the Shreveport facility and placed in intensive care.

Dr. G.E. Ghali, of LSU Health Shreveport, told The Advocate that Letlow didn’t have any underlying health conditions that would have placed him at greater risk to COVID-19.

Letlow, from the small town of Start in Richland Parish, was elected in a December runoff election for the sprawling 5th District U.S. House seat representing central and northeastern regions of the state, including the cities of Monroe and Alexandria.

He was to fill the seat being vacated by his boss, Republican Ralph Abraham. Letlow had been Abraham’s chief of staff and ran with Abraham’s backing for the job.

Leaves wife, 2 children

Gov. John Bel Edwards urged people to pray for Letlow’s family.

“COVID-19 has taken Congressman-elect Letlow from us far too soon,” the Democratic governor said in a statement. “I am heartbroken that he will not be able to serve our people as a U.S. representative, but I am even more devastated for his loving family.”

Letlow is survived by his wife, Julia Barnhill Letlow, and two children.

U.S. House leaders offered their condolences Tuesday night.

“May it be a comfort to Luke’s wife Julia and their children Jeremiah and Jacqueline that so many mourn their loss and are praying for them at this sad time,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said: “Our hearts break tonight as we process the news of Congressman-elect Luke Letlow’s passing.”

Before working for Abraham, Letlow had worked for former Gov. Bobby Jindal’s administration. Jindal’s one-time chief of staff, Timmy Teepell, described Letlow on Twitter as “a good man with a kind heart and a passion to serve. He loved Louisiana and his family. He was a brother and I’m heart broken he’s gone.”

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CBC | World News

Howie Meeker, former NHL star and Hockey Night in Canada icon, dies at 97

Howie Meeker, a former NHL player, Hockey Night in Canada icon and legendary personality, died Sunday at age 97 at Nanaimo General Hospital in B.C.

Meeker, who won four Stanley Cups with Toronto and was the oldest living Maple Leaf, was an NHL star who won rookie of the year honours in 1947 after scoring 27 goals and 45 points in 55 games.

A spokesperson for the Maple Leafs, the team that signed Meeker to a free-agent contract on April 13, 1946, confirmed his death earlier Sunday. There was no immediate word on the cause.

Meeker went on to become a broadcaster and was known for phrases such as “Jiminy Cricket,” “Golly gee willikers” and “Stop it right there!” His work with HNIC earned Meeker the Foster Hewitt Memorial Award in 1998 after a 30-year career on CBC and TSN.


Born on Nov. 4, 1923 in Kitchener, Ont., Meeker played eight years with the Maple Leafs — winning NHL championships in 1947, 1948, 1949 and 1951 — and appeared in three all-star games.

He finished his NHL career at 30 in the 1953-54 season with 83 goals and 185 points in 388 regular-season games while adding 15 points in 42 playoff contests.

Most famously, he passed the puck to Bill Barilko for the 1951 Cup overtime winner against Montreal.

Skated into his 80s

Among Meeker’s other career highlights was scoring five goals in a 10-4 win over Chicago on Jan. 8, 1947, one of only 44 players to tally five or more times in a game.

He continued to play pro hockey on and off for another 15 years at a variety of levels, including the American Hockey League and Newfoundland Senior League, among others.

Meeker retired from playing after the 1968-69 season and kept skating into his 80s.

Dick Irvin, a fixture on HNIC for 33 years, told the Montreal Gazette in 2014 that Meeker was the first television analyst to break down the game and criticize players.

“‘You can’t do that!'” Irvin recalled Meeker saying. “‘See what he did? That was wrong! That guy J.C. Tremblay should never have done that. Tim Horton made a mistake! Look at what he’s doing there!’


Meeker spent two years as a Progressive Conservative member of Parliament while playing for the Leafs. He won the federal byelection in the Ontario riding of Waterloo South in 1951 but didn’t seek re-election two years later.

Ran hockey schools, wrote books

In 2010, he was named a Member of the Order of Canada and inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame.

Meeker, who also called St. John’s home through the years, ran hockey schools for more than 30 years and literally wrote the book on hockey — 1973’s Howie Meeker’s Hockey Basics.


During the ’70s, he offered up drills and tips during his Howie Meeker Hockey School sessions on CBC.

He later wrote another book called Golly Gee — It’s Me: The Howie Meeker Story. And he never ran short of opinions on how to improve the game he loved.



Meeker had six children with his first wife Grace — they were married for 55 years before she died of cancer. He remarried, living with wife Leah in Parksville on Vancouver Island where they were active in fundraising for the B.C. Guide Dog Services.

Funeral arrangements were pending.

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CBC | Sports News

Hall of Famer Joe Morgan, driving force of Big Red Machine, dies at 77

Joe Morgan, the Hall of Fame second baseman who became the sparkplug of the Big Red Machine and the prototype for baseball’s artificial turf era, has died. He was 77.

He died at his home Sunday in Danville, California, family spokesman James Davis said in statement Monday. Morgan was suffering from a nerve condition, a form of polyneuropathy.

Morgan’s death marked the latest among major league greats this year: Whitey Ford, Bob Gibson, Lou Brock, Tom Seaver and Al Kaline.

Morgan was a two-time NL Most Valuable Player, a 10-time All-Star and won five Gold Gloves. A 5-foot-7 dynamo known for flapping his left elbow at the plate, Little Joe could hit a home run, steal a base and disrupt any game with his daring.

Most of all, he completed Cincinnati’s two-time World Series championship team, driving a club featuring the likes of Pete Rose, Johnny Bench and Tony Perez to back-to-back titles.

Morgan’s tiebreaking single with two outs in the ninth inning of Game 7 in 1975 gave the Reds the crown in a classic matchup with Boston, and he spurred a four-game sweep of the Yankees the next season.

Morgan was the league’s MVP both years. And his Hall of Fame teammates and manager readily acknowledged he was the one that got it all started.


The smallest cog in the Big Red Machine was its most valuable piece, and easily a first-ballot pick for Cooperstown.

“He was just a good major league player when it didn’t mean anything,” former Reds and Tigers skipper Sparky Anderson once said. “But when it meant something, he was a Hall of Famer.”

In a 22-year career through 1984, Morgan scored 1,650 runs, stole 689 bases, hit 268 homers and batted .271. But those stats hardly reflected the force created on the field by the lefty-swinging No. 8.

Revolutionized the game

Confident and cocky, he also was copied. His habit of flapping his back elbow as a way to keep it high when hitting was imitated by many a Little Leaguer in Cincinnati and beyond.

“Joe wasn’t just the best second baseman in baseball history,” Bench said. “He was the best player I ever saw and one of the best people I’ve ever known.”

Health issues had slowed down Morgan in recent years. Knee surgery forced him to use a cane when he went onto the field at Great American Ball Park before the 2015 All-Star Game and he later needed a bone marrow transplant for an illness.

In his prime, Morgan helped to revolutionize the game with his quickness and many talents, especially once he hit the turf at Riverfront Stadium.

“Packed unusual power into his extraordinarily quick 150-lb. fireplug frame,” he was praised on his Hall of Fame plaque.

Morgan got his start with Houston in 1963, when the team was called the .45s and still played on grass. Once he became a full-time player in 1965 when the club became the Astros and moved into the Astrodome, he began to provide a glimpse of what speedy, multi-skilled players could do on the new kind of turf.

The Reds had already built a formidable team, but they came up short in 1970, losing to Baltimore in the World Series. Cincinnati made a shocking trade for Morgan after the 1971 season, giving up slugger Lee May and All-Star second baseman Tommy Helms in an eight-player swap.

Dominant 2nd baseman

Morgan turned out to be exactly what the Reds needed to take the next step.

“Joe fit in with the rest of us like the missing link in the puzzle,” Rose once said.

Rose was the dashing singles hitter, on his way to becoming the game’s career hits leader. Bench supplied the power. Perez was the clutch hitter. And Morgan did a bit of everything, slashing hits and stealing bases whenever needed.

Morgan got plenty of chances, too. Skilled at drawing walks, and helped by a small strike zone, he led the NL in on-base percentage in four of his first five years with the Reds, and finished with a career mark of .392.

“That’s when the game went to more speed,” Rose said. “There were guys who did more, but Joe stole bases when everyone at the park knew he would. He didn’t waste steals. He made them count. Joe probably could have stolen more. Lots of guys just steal to run up the numbers, and then they can’t when it counts to win the game. Joe made them count.”

Morgan scored a major league-leading 122 runs in his first season with the Reds and they reached the 1972 World Series, where they lost in seven games to Oakland.

The two championship seasons were his finest, making him the dominant second baseman of his time — many rated him as the greatest ever to play the position.

Morgan hit .327 with 17 homers, 94 RBIs and 67 stolen bases in 1975, then followed with a .320 average, 27 homers, 111 RBIs and 60 steals the next year. He was only the fifth second baseman in the NL to drive in more than 100 runs and also led the league in both on-base percentage and slugging percentage in 1976.


‘Big Red Machine’ greats (L-R) Pete Rose, Barry Larkin, Joe Morgan and Johnny Bench walk on the field prior to the 86th MLB All-Star Game in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

A series of injuries in the late 1970s diminished Morgan’s production — the years of throwing his body around on the turf had taken a toll. The Reds decided to dismantle the Big Red Machine, prompting Morgan to also leave.

He spent the 1980 season with Houston, helping the Astros to a NL West title. He played two seasons with San Francisco, and later was reunited with Rose and Perez in Philadelphia.

Morgan hit two home runs in the 1983 World Series as the Phillies lost in five games to Baltimore, and tripled in his final at-bat.

Morgan finished as a career .182 hitter in 50 post-season games. He played in 11 different series and batted over .273 in just one of them, a stat that surprises many considering his big-game reputation.

‘He did it all’

Raised in Oakland, Morgan returned to the Bay Area and played the 1984 season with the Athletics before retiring.

Morgan set the NL record for games played at second, ranked among the career leaders in walks and was an All-Star in every one of his years with the Reds.

After his playing career, he spent years as an announcer for the Reds, Giants and A’s, along with ESPN, NBC, ABC and CBS. He was on the board of the Hall of Fame and the Baseball Assistance Team.

Morgan was inducted into baseball’s Hall of Fame in 1990. The Reds also inducted him into their Hall of Fame and retired his number.

“He did it all, and he did it all the time,” said Bench, the first member of the Big Red Machine to enter the Hall. “I always thought that Joe was the best player I ever played with, and that takes in a lot of ground.”

Morgan recognized his place on one of baseball’s all-time greatest teams.

“Bench probably had the most raw baseball ability of any of us,” Morgan said before his Hall of Fame induction. “Pete obviously had the most determination to make himself the player he was. Perez was the unsung hero. I guess I was just a guy who could do a lot of things.”

He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Theresa; twin daughters Kelly and Ashley; and daughters Lisa and Angela from his first marriage to Gloria Morgan.

Funeral details are not yet set.

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Family seeks answers after woman suspected of having COVID-19 restrained and later dies in hospital

The family of a Toronto woman admitted to hospital on suspicion of having COVID-19 is demanding answers after she had an altercation with security, which they say left her unconscious and in intensive care.

Her relatives also received no word on her condition until just days before she died.

For 11 days, as Danielle Stephanie Warriner lay alone in a hospital bed, her family had no idea where she was or that she’d been restrained by guards and would never regain consciousness.

Five days after the family was finally contacted, the 43-year-old Warriner died. 

“I had no opportunity to communicate with her, I had no opportunity to support her,” her sister Denise Warriner told CBC News. “Whether it was going to help her or not, she didn’t have anybody there … It absolutely tears me apart.”

CBC News has learned two people employed with University Health Network (UHN) have been let go as a result of an ongoing internal review of what happened.

Struggles with bipolar disorder

Stephanie, as her family called her, was the younger of two sisters. Denise Warriner said her sister wore her heart on her sleeve.

“She felt everything,” Warriner said, recalling how as a child, Stephanie was fascinated with butterflies. One day, when the two girls came upon a dead butterfly in their backyard, Stephanie “just cried and cried and cried.”


Stephanie, as her family called her, was the younger of two sisters. She wore her heart on her sleeve, said her sister, Denise Warriner. (Submitted by Denise Warriner)

“It affected her so deeply … And that’s the kind of person that she grew to be as an adult.”

As the years went on, Stephanie struggled with bipolar disorder and substance abuse. 

At the best of times, she was “spunky” and “laughed at her own jokes,” her sister said. But things took a turn for the worse after a romantic breakup in March, which led to Stephanie living in a shelter.

Then, in late April, she was diagnosed with the novel coronavirus.

On April 21, Stephanie was admitted to Toronto General Hospital with symptoms of pneumonia. Against the advice of doctors, she left the facility multiple times, only to be brought back by police.

She was released on May 5 after further tests for the virus came back negative. But by May 10, she was back at the hospital, delirious and short of breath.

What happened next — and how Stephanie ended up dead following an incident with guards — is now the subject of a Toronto police investigation, a coroner’s investigation and an internal review by UHN, which includes Toronto General and several other hospitals. 

Hospital staff let go, disciplined

For months, Denise Warriner has been trying to find out exactly what transpired after her sister was admitted to the hospital.


As Denise Warriner’s fight for answers continues, she said she again finds herself in the role of Stephanie’s bodyguard, like when they were kids. (Chris Glover/CBC)

In addition to the two people who were let go from the hospital, two others have faced “internal disciplinary action,” UHN spokesperson Gillian Howard said in an emailed statement Tuesday. Whether these four employees were security staff or medical professionals, Howard would not specify. Nor would she say what kind of discipline they received.

The organization did not address specific questions about whether any protocol was broken, how many guards were allegedly involved or why Stephanie’s family wasn’t contacted for 11 days, saying UHN cannot discuss individual details outside a patient’s “circle of care.”

UHN also did not respond when asked about its policies around notifying emergency contacts. 

“We are extremely sorry that this happened at UHN and are working with the family, the Coroner and the Toronto Police Service to ensure that this incident is fully understood and the appropriate actions are taken now and in the future,” the statement said.

It’s the first major development Stephanie’s family has seen since her death — one her sister says they only learned about from speaking with CBC News.

“This is complete news to me … I don’t think that shows a commitment to transparency,” Denise Warriner said.

Handcuffed, later went into cardiac arrest

According to what her family has been able to piece together from medical records, Stephanie made her way to Toronto General Hospital on May 10, with confusion and shortness of breath. In addition to her mental health issues, she suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a lung condition with symptoms that can resemble those of COVID-19.

This time, a doctor told her, she would need to stay put. Not surprisingly to her sister, she tried to leave the next day.

Security was called to track her down, and told that she might have COVID-19. By the time they found her, Stephanie had made it down to the hospital’s main floor.

How much of a physical threat must she have been 5’4″, 120 lbs. and unable to breathe?– Denise Warriner

According to records seen by CBC News, security located her outside a service elevator, where she became “combative.” She was handcuffed and shortly after, went into cardiac arrest.

She was revived and taken to intensive care, where she began having seizures. On May 20, she was transferred to Toronto Western Hospital. At the time, her family was still unaware of what had happened to her.

‘How much of a physical threat must she have been?’

Meanwhile, Denise Warriner had been trying to track her sister down. She had made calls to police and various hospitals, and was getting ready to file a missing person’s report.

“[They] knew who I was, [they] knew where I was and I was grasping at straws trying to contact her,” Warriner said, noting she was listed as her sister’s emergency contact and had been phoned during previous hospital stays. 

It wasn’t until May 22 — 11 days after the incident with guards — that Warriner finally got a phone call. It was Toronto Western Hospital, which said her sister was in intensive care with a brain injury.

By May 27, Stephanie was dead, leaving her family reeling and with many questions.


On May 10, Stephanie Warriner made her way to Toronto General Hospital with confusion and shortness of breath. The following day, she tried to leave and was restrained by guards before becoming unresponsive. (David Donnelly/CBC)

“How much of a physical threat must she have been [at] 5’4″, 120 lbs. and unable to breathe? Where is the reasonable threat assessment here?” Denise Warriner asked.

She also asked why the hospital didn’t issue a “code white,” which would have sent in staff trained in de-escalation —something the hospital would not comment on when asked by CBC News.

“There’s just so many gaps, so much information missing … It smells like rotten apples,” Warriner said.

Denied access to video footage

CBC News has confirmed video footage of the incident exists — but so far, the family has not been allowed to see it.

Toronto Police have so far turned down Denise Warriner’s requests to view the footage, she said, telling her instead to file an access to information request. That request was denied.


For months, Denise Warriner, right, has been trying to find out exactly what transpired after her sister Stephanie, left, was admitted to hospital. (Submitted by Denise Warriner)

Meanwhile, she has sent a letter to Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders and the detective in charge of the case, pleading for the video to be shared with the family.

In a statement, Toronto police said they have received a letter from the family’s lawyer and are conducting a “sudden death investigation and are thoroughly reviewing all of the circumstances around it.”

“The investigators remain in contact with the family and will continue to update them as appropriate while maintaining the integrity of the investigation,” the statement said.

Meanwhile, as Warriner’s fight for answers continues, she finds herself again in the role of Stephanie’s bodyguard, as she was when they were kids — only this time, her sister is no longer around. 

“It just hurts my heart, it really hurts my heart,” Warriner said. “She had walked into a hospital to access help … and she leaves on her deathbed.”

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Former Maple Leaf Eddie Shack dies at 83

Eddie Shack, one of the NHL’s most colourful players on and off the ice, has died. He was 83.

The Toronto Maple Leafs announced the news in a tweet Sunday morning.


Known for his bruising style, distinctive skating gait and larger-than-life personality, Shack won four Stanley Cups with Toronto in the 1960s, including the franchise’s last victory in 1967.

Nicknamed “The Entertainer” — with his trademark cowboy hat and luxurious moustache — he scored the winning goal for the Leafs in the 1963 final.

The native of Sudbury, Ont., played parts of 17 seasons from 1958 through 1975 with six different teams, including nine years with the Maple Leafs.

Former Maple Leafs captain Doug Gilmour, who played with the team in the 1990’s, said in a tweet he was “sad at the loss but so happy to have known him.”

“Eddie Shack taught me two important things — see humour in just about everything, and live like a Champion,” Gilmour said. “Four cups with the Leafs and a personality larger than life.”

Shack collected 239 goals, 465 points and 1,431 penalty minutes in 1,047 NHL games. The winger added six goals and seven assists and 151 penalty minutes in 74 playoff contests.

In October 2016, Shack was listed as No. 68 on The One Hundred, a list of the 100 greatest Leafs that was released as part of the team’s centennial anniversary.

Shack was no ordinary player

Not many hockey players are celebrated in a song or top the charts. But Shack was no ordinary hockey player.

Clear the Track by Douglas Rankine with The Secrets, started: “Clear the track, here comes Shack. He knocks ’em down and he gives ’em a whack. He can score goals, he’s got a knack. Eddie, Eddie Shack.”

The song, the brainchild of broadcaster Brian McFarlane, debuted in February 1966 and topped the Toronto music chart.

Shack was a bull in a china shop and took a toll on the opposition, knocking out Gordie Howe twice. But he recalled striking a deal with the legendary Howe that ended their on-ice hostilities when they met at a golf tournament in Vermont.

They agreed not to hit each other from then on, shaking hands on it.

Shack recalled Jean Beliveau asking him why he would hit him and then apologize.

“I said, ‘Jean, sometimes I lie,”‘ he said with a laugh in a TV interview in November 2019.

But Shack also knew when he was outmatched, famously skating away from Bob Kelly and the Plager brothers in a game against St. Louis in the early 70s.

Won 4 Stanley Cups with Maple Leafs

Shack drifted away from the Leafs’ organization after retiring, but like many players from the team’s 1960s dynasty, had returned to the fold in recent years.

Born to Ukrainian immigrants on Feb. 11, 1937, Shack was working at a butcher’s shop in Sudbury when he tried out for the Guelph Biltmores of the Ontario Hockey Association. He went to play five seasons for the Biltmores and one for the AHL Providence Reds before signing with the New York Rangers, the Biltmores’ parent club.

Shack made his NHL debut in 1958 and was traded to Toronto in 1960 after refusing to go to Detroit.

He won the Cup with the Leafs in 1962, ’63, ’64 and ’67.

Shack scored a career-high 26 goals with Toronto in 1966, but was traded to the Boston Bruins the next spring following the Leafs’ final Cup win. He would go on to play with the Los Angeles Kings, Buffalo Sabres and Pittsburgh Penguins before returning to Toronto for two final seasons.

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Russian figure skating star Ekaterina Alexandrovskaya dies at 20

The Australian Olympic Committee has confirmed the death of former world junior pairs figure skating champion Ekaterina Alexandrovskaya in Moscow.

The cause of the 20-year-old Alexandrovskaya’s death on Friday has not yet been disclosed.

She was born in Russia but in 2016 obtained Australian citizenship and competed for her adopted country at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics with skating partner Harley Windsor.

The pair won the 2017 world junior title. Alexandrovskaya retired from the sport in February after sustaining several injuries.

Windsor, Australia’s first Indigenous athlete to compete at a Winter Olympics, said he was “devastated” by the news of Alexandrovskaya’s death.

“The amount we had achieved during our partnership is something I can never forget and will always hold close to my heart,” he said in an Instagram post.

Ian Chesterman, chef de mission for the Australian team in Pyeongchang, said the news was a terrible blow for all those who knew the skater.

“It is enormously sad to lose Katia, who was a vibrant and talented person and an incredible athlete,” Chesterman said. “She was quiet and humble in her manner but incredibly determined to be the best she could be. Life since the Games has not been easy for her and this is another timely reminder of just how fragile life is.”


It is the second death of an Australian Winter OIympian in 10 days. Alex Pullin, a two-time world champion snowboarder and three-time Olympian, drowned while spearfishing on July 8 on the Gold Coast north of Brisbane.

“Katia’s death is another blow to our winter sports community who are still reeling from our loss of `Chumpy’ Pullin,” Chesterman said.

Geoff Lipshut, chief executive of the Olympic Winter Institute of Australia, said Alexandrovskaya has a special place in the country’s sports history.

“Katia and Harley were Australia’s first figure skating world champions,” Lipshut said. “She came to Australia to fulfill her sporting dreams.

“The news today is so sad, my thoughts are with Katia’s family in Russia, Harley and the skating community in Australia. I will remember Katia as a young person of great talent and remarkable potential.”

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‘Selling Sunset’ Star Chrishell Stause’s Mother Dies After Battle With Cancer

Chrishell Stause’s Mother Dies After Battle With Cancer | Entertainment Tonight

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