Tag Archives: positive

Positive COVID-19 tests in Calgary bubble halt playoffs at men’s curling worlds

Playoffs at the world men’s curling championship in Calgary have been suspended because of positive tests for the COVID-19 virus.

Those who tested positive are asymptomatic and don’t involve playoff teams, according to Curling Canada.

  • Watch and engage with CBC Sports’ That Curling Show live  Saturday 7:30 p.m. ET; Sunday 5 p.m. ET) featuring the men’s curling championship on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

But games are halted until athletes and staff on playoff teams are tested Saturday and receive their results.

“All teams that made the playoffs will undergo testing on Saturday morning, and until the results are clear and it’s known that the players and event staff are safe, no further games will be played,” Curling Canada said in a statement.

Those who have tested positive for the virus are in quarantine and contact tracing is underway, the organization added.

Canada’s Brendan Bottcher was eliminated from gold-medal contention Friday evening in a 5-3 loss to Scotland.

Saturday’s playoff game involving the United States and Switzerland, and semifinals involving Russia and Sweden are on hold. The medal games are scheduled for Sunday.

Fourteen teams, including 13 who travelled to Calgary from outside the country, competed in the men’s world championship.

The field was whittled down to six teams by Friday afternoon. The eliminated teams were preparing to travel home.

WATCH | Scotland upends Canada in qualification game:

Canada’s Brendan Bottcher loses to Scotland’s Bruce Mouat 5-3 in the qualification game at the men’s world curling championship. 1:04

The Canadian men’s, women’s and mixed doubles championships held at WinSport’s Markin MacPhail Centre before the world championship were completed without any positive tests for the coronavirus.

Athletes and team personnel quarantine and are tested upon arrival in Calgary before competing. They’re confined to the arena and the their hotel across the highway.


A pair of Grand Slams with international men’s and women’s fields are scheduled to start next week in Calgary’s curling bubble.

Participants in those tournaments have begun arriving in Calgary to undergo their testing and quarantine before getting on the ice.

The women’s world championship, which was relocated from Switzerland to Calgary, is planned for April 30 to May 6.

WATCH | Where Canada fits in the current curling climate:

The two-time world champion explains how the rest of the world has caught up to Canadian curling. 3:20

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CBC | Sports News

Toronto FC camp paused after ‘multiple’ team members test positive for COVID-19

Toronto FC’s pre-season has ground to a halt after a number of positive COVID-19 tests.

The MLS team said Monday club personnel are currently isolating and training has halted pending contact tracing and follow-up testing. The club did not identify who tested positive, saying only they were members of the “team delegation.”

The club’s north Toronto training centre has been closed. The club had been practising behind closed doors there and at BMO Field, whose playing surface has underground heating.

GM Ali Curtis said it started with one positive test and is now at “a small handful” of positives, The club is now testing everyone daily while working with local health authorities with the goal of getting “back to training in a safe way.”

Citing privacy concerns, Curtis declined to comment on the condition of those who tested positive.

“We feel good about the strength of the medical protocols. We’re trying to be smart about this and trying to use all our resources to ensure that everyone returns to health and returns to play in a really, really safe way,” he said.

“Every team in every different league has been dealing with this. We were really fortunate in that last year we didn’t have one staff or player test positive during the season. Last season was a great season for us in that respect. This year, we’ve got to respond in the right way to make sure that everyone is as safe as possible.”

Toronto finished out the 2020 campaign in East Hartford, Conn., due to pandemic-related border restrictions. The club plans to begin the season in Florida, with “home” games either in Orlando or Tampa to start.

Toronto opened camp Feb. 17, allowed to begin its pre-season early to prepare for the Canadian Championship final against Forge FC of the Canadian Premier League. While no date has been announced yet for the game, March 20 has been floated.

The winner of the Canadian Championship advances to the Scotiabank CONCACAF Champions League, to meet Mexico’s Club Leon in a round-of-16 tie that opens April 7.

The MLS regular season kicks of April 17.

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Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador tests positive for COVID-19

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said Sunday he has tested positive for COVID-19 and that the symptoms are mild.

Mexico’s president, who has been criticized for his handling of his country’s pandemic, said on his official Twitter account that he is under medical treatment.

“I regret to inform you that I am infected with COVID-19,” he tweeted. “The symptoms are mild but I am already under medical treatment. As always, I am optimistic. We will all move forward.”

Lopez Obrador, 67, has long been criticized for not setting an example of prevention in public. He has rarely been seen wearing a mask and continued to keep up a busy travel schedule taking commercial flights.

He has resisted locking down the economy, noting the devastating effect it would have on so many Mexicans who live day to day.

Early in the pandemic, asked how he was protecting Mexico, Lopez Obrador removed two religious amulets from his wallet and proudly showed them off.

“The protective shield is the `Get thee behind me, Satan,”‘ Lopez Obrador said, reading off the inscription on the amulet, “Stop, enemy, for the Heart of Jesus is with me.

Sputnik V vaccine negotiations expected Monday

His announcement came shortly after news emerged that he would speak with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday about obtaining doses of the Sputnik V COVID-19 vaccine.

Foreign Affairs Secretary Marcelo Ebrard said on Twitter the two leaders would speak about the bilateral relationship and supplying doses of the vaccine.

The vaccine has not been approved for use in Mexico, but the government is desperate to fill supply gaps for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Mexico has given more than 618,000 vaccine doses.

Mexico has registered nearly 150,000 COVID-19 deaths and more than 1.7 million infections. Hospitals in the capital have been near capacity for weeks as a surge of cases followed the holiday season.

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Canada’s COVID-19 case numbers show early positive signs

Cases of COVID-19 are declining in many parts of Canada, but experts say those early positive signs are dependent on widespread restrictions. 

Quebec, now under a province-wide curfew, has seen new cases declineOntario has showed 10 consecutive declines in its seven-day average, a metric that helps to spot long-term trends compared to daily numbers that can spike up and down.

Caroline Colijn, an infectious disease modeller at Simon Fraser University, said most of the provinces seem to be declining.

“Ontario’s kind of uncertain, Saskatchewan’s growing still or again, but the rest are kind of flat or declining,” said Colijn, who also holds a Canada Research Chair in mathematics for evolution, infection and public health.

“That’s the first decline we’ve seen in Quebec and Ontario for quite a while,” she said. “In our models, it looks like a genuine decline.”

More tools needed

In B.C., for example, Colijn said the epidemic is stabilizing with strict measures such as telling people not to socialize outside their household.

But Colijn fears Ontario’s stay-at-home order, Quebec’s curfew and restrictions in other provinces aren’t solutions that people can sustain for months.

If people don’t limit their number of contacts with others then cases will start to climb again until vaccinations reach the general population. 

“Unless we want to do this for six months, we do need to be thinking about throwing other tools that we have available at this problem.”

WATCH | Researchers test new tools for COVID-19 surveillance:

Researchers at Dalhousie University in Halifax are working on a 3D-printed ball that can collect a building’s sewage and test the water for coronavirus. They say the tool could be used to trace outbreaks and to test the effectiveness of vaccines. 4:05

Colijn said widespread restrictions, symptomatic testing and contact tracing remain cornerstone tools. But those tools should be supplemented with wider rapid testing technologies coming to the fore, which Colijn believes could support re-opening the economy.

Federal and provincial scientists are validating rapid tests, currently used at remote mines as well as the film and airline industries, for more widespread use. 

Sask. heading in the wrong direction

Nazeem Muhajarine, an epidemiologist at the University of Saskatchewan, divides the country’s into three main groups based on per-capita case counts:

  • The top: Atlantic Canada, which has the fewest cases.
  • The middle: Manitoba, Alberta and B.C., which have showed month-long improvements in COVID-19 activity following lockdowns. If trends in Ontario and Quebec continue, then they could be added to the middle group. 
  • The bottom: Saskatchewan, which Muhajarine said isn’t even heading in the right direction, with an average of 300 new cases daily.

Muhajarine is concerned about the steep climb in COVID-19 deaths in the Prairie province.

“On Dec. 1, we had 51 deaths and by Jan. 1 it tripled to 155,” he noted.

In the first 21 days of the month, another 84 people have died in Saskatchewan.

“We really need to reverse course,” Muhajarine said. “To do that, we need very strict measures with a stay-at-home order and enforcement of orders. When we see the case numbers reverse course, we have to get our testing, tracing and isolation regime back up.”

Restrictions on retail stores, restaurants and bars could help bring cases, hospitalizations and deaths down given how Saskatchewan is “stretched to the limit,” he said.

Even places with early signs of decline, like Ontario, will see hospitalizations and deaths continue to climb for a period because of the lag time from new infections in December, health experts say. 

Essential workplaces key for Ontario

Dr. Sumon Chakrabarti, an infectious disease physician with Trillium Health Partners in Mississauga, Ont., said the province’s seven-day averages are encouraging.


A worker at the Gateway Postal facility, in Mississauga, Ont., on Wednesday. Canada Post confirms a major outbreak of COVID-19 at the plant — the largest mail facility in the country that reflects how cases continue to occur among essential workers. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

“We’re now more than two weeks past what would be the New Year’s surge,” Chakrabarti said, referencing people socializing over the holidays despite advice from public health officials and politicians to stay at home. 

Now that the holiday peak in new cases is over, regular winter transmission of the virus is happening in the population, he said.

Chakrabarti recalls how during the province’s first wave in the spring, cases came down and then were stuck at a plateau for months, which he said could happen again.

Driving case counts down further would ease pressure on health-care systems and protect vulnerable residents of long-term care homes.

The key, he says, is to tackle where transmission is still happening: essential workplaces.

“We were seeing people getting infected at work and then bringing it home to their family, where it was being amplified,” he said of the first wave. “That’s still happening and something a lockdown doesn’t address.”

It’s why Chakrabarti and others advocate for:

“Yes, there are some people who are breaking the rules,” Chakrabarti said. “But we also need to look at the very different industrial setups because these factors are huge, right? This is one of the reasons why things haven’t ever really turned quickly in Ontario.”

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4 members of Manchester City women’s team test positive for COVID-19

Manchester City, home to Canadian international Janine Beckie, says four members of its women’s team have tested positive for COVID-19.

The FA Women’s Super League club did not identify the affected players but said they were self-isolating in accordance with Football Association and U.K. government protocol.

“Everyone at the club wishes our colleagues a speedy recovery ahead of their return to work, training and competition,” the club said in a statement.

City, which currently stands fourth in the table at 5-1-3, is scheduled to host the West Ham women behind closed doors on Saturday.

The Manchester City men have also been hit by COVID, with six players missing from Sunday’s 3-1 win at at Chelsea.

This past November, Beckie scored in an FA Cup final for Manchester City as the defending champions beat Everton 3-1 after extra time.

The 26-year-old forward, a dual citizen raised in Colorado by her Canadian parents, signed a two-year extension with Man City back in April.

WATCH | Janine Beckie goal seals victory for Man City:

Canadian Janine Beckie scored the insurance marker as Manchester City beat Everton 3-1 in the Women’s FA Cup final. 0:30

It was City’s third Women’s FA Cup triumph in four seasons — a winning streak that began with another American, Carli Lloyd, netting in the 2017 victory over Birmingham.

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IIHF says 8 Germans, 2 Swedes test positive for COVID-19 inside world junior bubble

The International Ice Hockey Federation says eight players from Germany’s team at the world junior hockey championship have tested positive for COVID-19 inside the Edmonton bubble.

The IIHF says the Germans will all remain in quarantine until Thursday. The country is scheduled to open its tournament against Finland the following afternoon — Dec. 25 — before facing Canada on Boxing Day.

The quarantine means Germany, with a roster that includes Ottawa Senators prospect and 2020 No. 3 overall draft pick Tim Stuetzle, will miss exhibition games against Austria and the Czech Republic ahead of the annual under-20 event.

The IIHF also announced two members of Sweden’s team staff have tested positive.

The Swedes will stay in quarantine until Monday, with the exception of those exempt from serving longer periods based on previous positive tests that “provide a personal immunity and no threat of infection to others.”

Tournament set to start Christmas Day

Sweden is scheduled to face Canada in an exhibition game Monday.

The IIHF says more than 2,000 tests have been conducted on players, staff and game officials since they entered the Edmonton bubble Sunday.

Teams without positive tests were eligible to begin training Friday.

The tournament is scheduled to begin Christmas Day — including that meeting between the Germans and Finns — at Rogers Place. The first exhibition games are slated for Sunday.

The NHL implemented similar bubbles for the restart of its pandemic-delayed 2019-20 season this summer. The bubbles are tightly controlled and include strict health and safety measures implemented in hopes of keeping the coronavirus at bay.

The league said it had zero positive results over more than two months.

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French President Emmanuel Macron tests positive for COVID-19

France’s Élysée Palace says President Emmanuel Macron has tested positive for COVID-19.

It said the president took a test “as soon as the first symptoms appeared.” The brief statement did not say what symptoms Macron experienced.

It said he would isolate himself for seven days. “He will continue to work and take care of his activities at a distance,” it added.

It was not immediately clear what contact tracing efforts were in progress. Macron attended a European Union summit at the end of last week, where he notably had a bilateral meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. He met on Wednesday with the prime minister of Portugal. There was no immediate comment from Portuguese officials.

Macron on Wednesday also held the government’s weekly cabinet meeting in the presence of Prime Minister Jean Castex and other ministers. Castex’s office said that the prime minister is also self-isolating for seven days.

Political party chiefs from the Senate and France’s lower house of parliament, the National Assembly, were also in isolation as they had a lunch with Macron earlier this week.

The French presidency confirmed that Macron’s trip to Lebanon scheduled for next week is being cancelled.

Macron is the latest world leader to test positive for COVID-19, joining a growing list of others just as inoculation drives against the illness are beginning in a number of countries.

U.S President Donald Trump, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, and the president of Brazil, Jair Bolsonaro, are among the world leaders and prominent politicians who have contracted the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

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Trump says personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani tested positive for COVID-19

U.S. President Donald Trump’s lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, has tested positive for COVID-19, Trump said on Sunday, after a wave of travel by the former New York mayor seeking to persuade Republican state lawmakers to overturn the Nov. 3 election results.

The 76-year-old Giuliani is the latest in a long line of people close to the White House, including Trump himself, sickened in a pandemic that has killed more than 280,000 Americans.

Giuliani did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Two sources told Reuters that Giuliani was at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C., on Sunday. One of the sources said he had not been admitted yet. The hospital did not immediately respond to requests for confirmation.

Giuliani has been spearheading Trump’s floundering effort to overturn his election loss to Democratic president-elect Joe Biden through a flurry of lawsuits. Both Trump and Giuliani have repeatedly claimed, contrary to evidence, that the outcome was marred by widespread fraud.


Giuliani and Trump are seen at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., on Aug. 14. (Susan Walsh/The Associated Press)

State and federal officials have repeatedly said there is no evidence of fraud on any significant scale.

Giuliani visited Georgia on Thursday, where he has been urging state lawmakers to stop certification of Biden’s win after making similar pleas in Michigan on Wednesday and Arizona on Monday.

Trump and many of his close associates have balked at public health officials’ advice to wear masks and avoid crowds to stem transmission of the respiratory illness, which has roared to record levels in the United States as winter approaches.

Giuliani, who developed an international profile as “America’s Mayor” for his leadership after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, has faced mounting legal troubles during the Trump administration.

Federal prosecutors in Manhattan have been investigating Giuliani’s business dealings in Ukraine, and two associates, Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, have been charged with campaign finance violations.

Giuliani has not been criminally charged and has denied wrongdoing. Parnas and Fruman have pleaded not guilty.

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After positive test, Canadian Olympian Kelly VanderBeek reflects on stigma of COVID-19

Awaiting round two of their covid tests, my seven-year-old son tells his Dad, “I hope I have COVID, so I can hug mom.”

That statement, so simple, so sad, shows the culmination of what quarantine feels like.

And we’re the lucky ones. The ones with a comfortable, large and well-equipped home. With friends who deliver food and, most notably, an asymptomatic COVID case.

I have COVID-19.

A statement I dreaded ever saying, and not for the right reasons. I feared saying it not because I feared getting it. I feared saying it because of the social judgment I expected to accompany it and for the fear of spreading it to more vulnerable people.

Now, in what I hope is the height of the second wave, I reflect on the social stigma of COVID-19.

Now I’m talking (or rather, writing)

I am a very public figure. Still, I didn’t want to write or talk about this positive test.

We are supporters of mask wearing, with hand sanitizers stashed everywhere. Still, my son goes to school and we’ve partaken in sport and small, socially distanced gatherings.

So, where/how did we get it?

WATCH | VanderBeek wants women’s sports to be a priority in son’s life:

For International Women’s Day we’re asking you to join us and retired alpine skier Kelly VanderBeek in making a commitment to supporting girls in sport. 0:55

Hockey … most likely.

Although the effects of the pandemic have been felt far and wide, our community has been largely untouched by the disease itself. For the most part, our numbers were well under 10 cases in a valley that includes Canmore, Banff and Lake Louise, Alta. Considering that hundreds of thousands of tourists continued to pour through this area over the summer months, this fact was a source of pride.

Then, Halloween came and far too many people partied. The numbers have since skyrocketed and we’re now one of the highest (if not the highest) rate of positive tests per capita in Alberta.

Scary stuff

My husband and I are both on-ice volunteers with my sons U9 team. After a Monday night practice, we received word, late Wednesday evening that someone on the ice had tested positive. We were required to go into 14 days of quarantine — all three of us.

First things first, we booked in for testing the following day, even though we knew it wouldn’t shorten our quarantine period. Thankfully we did.

Test results came back (much later than expected). First for my son and husband on Saturday morning, then mine late that evening. They were negative, I was positive.

I wear a full visor on the ice. This makes it a bit harder to hear and be heard, so I get extra close to the kids. Plus, we were, more or less, told that masks weren’t welcomed on the ice, even though they are mandatory everywhere else in the building.

Thankfully, I’m asymptomatic. However, that fact also showcases why contact tracing is so vital. I would never have gotten tested had I not been told I was exposed.

From what I can tell — and I called everyone I crossed paths with while potentially contagious — I didn’t pass on the disease. Making me extra thankful I was practicing social distancing and mask wearing.

Now what?

For now, I sit in my basement, largely on vacation, as my husband cares for my son and delivers my meals.

I write, thankful for the care I’m receiving and for being the luckiest of COVID patients — asymptomatic.

Still, I am acutely aware of the impact isolation is having on my family. My sons emotions are frayed and my husband is exhausted both from the work load and from the unknown. Did I pass COVID onto them? Will our quarantine be extended? And most notably, the fear of knowing symptoms may be just around the corner.

Now, with bated breath we wait for our second round of test results. Thankful, we have a breath to take.

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Marta, 6-time world soccer player of the year, tests positive for COVID-19

Brazil’s six-time world player of the year Marta has tested positive for COVID-19, the country’s soccer governing body (CBF) said on Saturday.

Marta, 34, has been withdrawn from the national team that is set to face Ecuador in two friendly matches at home on Nov. 27 and Dec. 1.

The CBF did not give any details about the forward’s condition but they have informed her club, Orlando Pride in the National Women’s Soccer League, saying they would provide any assistance necessary.

Marta was the first player, male or female, to score in five World Cups with 17 strikes in total – also a record.

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